How to know if you need to requeen?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, May 27, 2012.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Our cut out that we did just doesn't seem to be working ver hard, compared to the aother 3. They are very docile and calm, but dont seem to be working very hard. There is a queen, I have seen her a couple of times.

    I am feeding them sugar syrup and have inserted 2 empty frames in the middle of their 5 cutout frames. They are working on those 2 frames but just are very slow compaired to the other 3.

    Just wondering at what point do we decide to ReQueen. It being from a cutout, we don't know how old the queen is, right?

    This is the funnest hive to inspect though. They hardly fly at you at all. Just stay on the frames. Really don't have to use smoke on them.

    Thanks,
     
  2. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    As for pulling comb, it seems that swarm captures pull comb like WHOA! I don't know, maybe since they were planning on finding some empty hole in a tree somewhere, they were already making the wax in their bellies or something, or getting ready to, because they hit the ground running when they land.

    So, could just be your other hives are just going that much *faster* than your cut-out.

    I think replacing a queen should be determined by how she's laying, rather than how the workers are pulling comb. I'd say just keep a watch on her brood pattern and her eggs. Also, bees are rather quick to replace their own ailing queens. I mean, it may not be as quick as we keepers would like when we're trying to have big robust hives making a lot of honey, heh, but it's one of the things they know to do for themselves and we may not know how old a queen is, but they do!

    Please note: I'm biased towards not replacing queens much at all.

    I don't like to mess up brood patterns from what the ladies are putting them into; there's all sorts of environment things going on in hives and I don't disrupt their nice warm brood nest. Seems like the wax-workers also avoid empty frames right up in the middle of the brood, like they have to be quiet around the babies or something.
    So when I'm trying to encourage them to build out a frames, I'll fiddle about with nearly any other frames in the hive, and swap them if they're favoring a side, put empties right up next to brood, and I might push an aging brood frame further to an edge (like just a few capped left to hatch, and no new brood) to replace it with a foundation or half drawn frame. But I wouldn't personally put a foundation-only empty in between two very active brood frames.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a yankee snip..
    Our cut out that we did just doesn't seem to be working ver hard, compared to the aother 3. They are very docile and calm

    tecumseh:
    it sounds like you may be confusing several issues here that are somewhat related to the queen but not totally a product of her performance. it sounds to me like the cut out simply has a better disposition.

    a heinlein fan snip...
    I think replacing a queen should be determined by how she's laying, rather than how the workers are pulling comb. I'd say just keep a watch on her brood pattern and her eggs. Also, bees are rather quick to replace their own ailing queens.

    tecumseh:
    very nicely stated... and the primary rule I always follow myself. here in addition to this 'culling' criterion any hive that has a really bad disposition the queen gets pinched.
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Now Tec,
    with all my reading, AHB start the day earlier, stay working longer, collect substantial volumes of honey. Just one minor personality trait, they want to destroy you if you want their honey.
    lol
    Barry
     
  5. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    lol Barry, Im working 7 days a week now, getting alot done, and if I catch some1 breaking into my house and I find them rooting around in my fridge and I shoot them does that make me a "africanized Beekeeper" ? wanders off scratching his head (nowonder my wife keeps pinching me)
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    barry writes:
    with all my reading

    tecumseh:
    based on first hand accounts of other of dealing with africanized hives in some numbers and my own experience from long ago (being informed after the fact that the entire yard was 'somewhat' africanized <not so funny) most folks should be satisfied to only have to read about africanized bees.

    as far as I know from very reliable sources an africanized bee collects about half the surplus of a european bee and then uses this to swarm and swarm and swarm. they do appear to do a better job of pollination than european bees.