How to make a pollen sub.?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by larry tate, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. larry tate

    larry tate New Member

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    I have a friend that is dead set on making pollen sub. Has anyone got a rrecipe? Thanks
     
  2. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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  3. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Pollen-Substitute Patties
    Use: Stimulates brood production; apply in late February or early March, Michigan.Recipe:
    (Makes a 1.5 pound patty)
    Dry Part
    1.5 cups (8oz.) fat-free soy flour
    .5 cup (1oz.) Brewer’s yeast
    Sugar Syrup
    1.5 cups (12oz.) granulated sugar
    .75 cup (6oz.) Hot water

    Mix dry ingredients and add slowly to syrup until mixture is like stiff bread dough. Press between wax paper. Place patty over cluster with wax paper up.

    We use this recipe and it does work. by mid April the bees are thick inb the hives waiting for splits to be done.



    Winter feeding.Candy Board
    Use: Winter feeding.
    Recipe:
    The formula for the fondant candy supplied by Dr. Roger Hoopingarner
    15 lbs. sugar
    3 lbs. white corn syrup
    4 cups water
    ½ tsp. cream of tartar
    (smaller quantities can be made using the ratios above)
    Dissolve the sugar in water and stir while heating the mixture to 240 degrees F. Let the syrup cool to about 180 degrees F., then beat until thickened and pour into the board ( like an inner cover with higher sides and no hole) to harden. Once the candy is hardened boards can be put onto the colonies candy side down over the top frames. Some beekeepers pour the candy into wax paper lined molds and then put these blocks on the frames while the inner cover is placed, with the deep side down, over them. Make the blocks no thicker than the depth of the inner cover rim.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    If fire ants were not such an issue here I would use candy boards myself (a lot of old beekeepers would tell you that a candy board was the very best way to feed bees).

    in regards to pollen patties the more sugar you add the faster the patties will be consume and you can also add canola oil to make the mixture wet. the canola oil contains a compound (long name which I can't recall right now) that the bees find to be beneficial.

    in the past I have made up pollen patties but I usually catch some local pollen that I add to the mix. my formula is equal part fat free soy flower, sugar, natural pollen and brewer's yeast.
     
  5. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Kare adds honey bee healthy to the mix but I don't know at what rate.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  6. larry tate

    larry tate New Member

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    Thanks for the replies. Where would you get a 5 lb. or so bag of brewers yeast?
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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  8. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    You can get brewer's yeast at most health food stores too, it makes a good supplement if you need B vitamins or help regulating blood sugar. It also adds a good amount of protein if you are trying to bulk up or build muscle mass.
     
  9. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Recipes are a dime a dozen

    The real trick, is getting products that are useable by the bees, and also have the correct nutritious values needed by the bees. Remember, bees will collect saw dust if in need. And not all brewers yeast is complete in the essential amino acids required by bees.

    By useable, I mean as example....a brewers yeast in powder form. This is usually created by a air dried spray method. If the brewers yeast is in pellet or granulated form, it about useless to the bees. The main protein (which is why you feed pollen supplements) will be carried and discarded outside the hive.

    Get the right brewers yeast, and the nutrition side is complete. Soy flour (not good for bees in large amounts or extended periods), powdered eggs, real pollen, vitamin C, various salts, and many other items are added to make recipes unique or more palatable to the bees.

    You can get all the recipes in the world. But without the right amino acid levels, or products actually digestable by the bees, your throwing money down the drain. You might as well roll the dice and buy patties from a supplier. Not that you might be getting anything better or saving money, but you will save yourself time.
     
  10. Joe

    Joe New Member

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    OK, I'll take a half dozen... do you accept PayPal?


    Freshness of ingredients seems like it would be difficult to assure. Especially for a hobbyist... like me :wave:
     
  11. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Ok, here was mine...

    By rough percentages....

    70% brewers yeast (air blown powder)
    10 % real pollen (powdered...not pellets)
    10% powdered egg (sifted to cull out big grains)
    10 Soy flour

    I would mix with heavy sugar syrup and honey. About a 80/20 syrup to honey.

    The last thing was canola oil. This made the patties soft and kept them from drying out.

    I also added salts, vitamin C, and various other herbs, etc. Some swear by garlic, or one thing or another. The key seems to always hold back on at least one or more "additives" so you can claim some special recipe. This is good for self marketing with your own "studies" to back up the fluff. This seems about the "norm" in the industry. (Don't ask....I'm not telling you my "additives.... :lol: Of course I no longer sell pollen supplement.)

    You can play around and add all the extra stuff. But the basics of the recipe was the first four ingredients.

    With any recipe, it's just not about getting them to eat something. But getting them to eat the right stuff that is nutritious and healthy for the bees.

    As a side note...I never added honey B healthy or other "come here for a free meal" smells. Some smells, will set off robbing as robber bees smell such things coming from other hives. And if your feeding when natural pollen (and nectar) are not coming into the hive (which is why you feed), it will not take much to start robbing.
     
  12. fatbeeman

    fatbeeman New Member

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    I agree with bjorn on that we all have our thing. I like useing my own honey to it along with lemmond grass oil some trea tree oil you can add some vitiam c tabs along. I keep a salt block in my bee yards mineral blocks help, but watch out for pesky deer .
    Don
     
  13. larry tate

    larry tate New Member

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    Does anyone know a source for reasonable priced soy flour? I have located at some of the health grocery stores but gosh $4.99 a pound. Better off to purchase premade at that price. Help appreciated.
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    here they sell soy flour at Krogers in the same isle as the other flours. I think the soy needs to be de-fatted.
     
  15. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I was getting it from Walter Kelley Bee supply, but see it is not in their new 2010 catalog. :cry:
     
  16. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

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    I made pollen patties today from alleyyooper's recipie. The health food store had "organic soy flour" they couldn't answer if it was "fat free" so I got it anyway. The patties do smell like the ones I bought - I put them in the freezer for now and will put them on the bees towards the end of the week. I don't know how long it will take them to eat the pattie I put on last Thursday??? I also put a helping of plain sugar on them (sprayed it with water) and took my inner feeders off. That should cure my moisture problem.

    It is getting close to time of putting 1:1 on them now. I usually do that with a boardman feeder - what about the rest of you?
     
  17. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Al- What does "wax paper up" mean? Patty on top of wax paper or wax paper on top of the patty and the patty on top of the frames?

    Thanks.
     
  18. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

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    I watched a bee program one time by Keith Delaplane and he just used his hive tool to break the paper (he froze the patties first) and put it on top of the frames - Either way I don't think it matters because the bees will eat the paper off.

    I just tore back the paper some because the patties are STICKEY!!!
     
  19. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    stevie ray writes:
    Al- What does "wax paper up" mean? Patty on top of wax paper or wax paper on top of the patty and the patty on top of the frames?

    tecumseh:
    when you make your own patties these are separated by one sheet of wax paper (actually I typically use news paper cut into may 6 inch squares). In order for the bees below to most easily access the pollen patties you place the paper up and the pattie down. as arkie stated...no matter how place the paper the bees will consume the patties and chew the paper up pretty quickly. feeding patties for me also means that sometime after the pattie feeding season the bottom board needs to be cleaned to eliminate the litter.
     
  20. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Bjornbee, how much canola oil do you use to a batch? Jack