how weird is this

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by reidi_tim, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    I got a call today from an pest control company today wanting to know if I do bee removal. The only people that know I have any interest in bees are a few of my employes, family and I talked about last weekend with the guy that does my acupuncture. So it was my acupuncturist who gave him my number. So there is a 100 + year old house that they are going to tear down, and in the walls of this house is a beehive that has been there for the last 18 years. The lady that owns has left the house standing just for the bees but from my understanding the house is becoming unsafe and has to go. So I was asked if I would go and remove the bees and they are willing to pay me for time and fuel. They are going to open up the wall for me all I have to do is collect the bees and comb. So I'm going to do it :Dancing:. So armed with what knowledge I've received here and no real world hands on. My wife tells me I'm insane and my daughter is there for, it wish me luck. So have I lost my mind????? ( or did I ever have it in the first place )
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Go for it. It's an opportunity, and an experience you will remember for the rest of your life.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    You, my friend, have just hit the jackpot.:thumbsup:

    18 years? :shock:

    Now there is some genetic material most of us would drool over. Do you or can you get access to a bee-vac?
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I had no experience until I did my first one also :lol:

    Just be sure to take plenty of empty frames, boxes and rubber bands..............in other words don't get caught short....trust me on that one.

    A bee vac is very handy but not really necessary.

    Just remember what you start you need to finish and don't get over whelmed.

    Ask any questions here and some one can certainly help you out.

    Best part is you can make a mess and not have to put the house back together or clean up.

    You CAN do it, just have confidence and be prepared to work all day, they aren't easy but they sure are fun!!
     
  5. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    ok so give me a check list on what to bring.... I have 5 5frame nucs frames with foundation. suit smoker spray bottle. do i need a queen cage? i do not have a bee vac. So I think I should strip out all the comb, should I put some of the comb into the nucs? or am I trying to over think this? The only thing I don't have is a black bear suit for my daughter :lol:
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You don't need drawn comb. Use empty frames and large rubber bands to hold the combs with brood in the frames. DO NOT try to mount the honey combs in frames. Honey is too heavy and will not stay in the frames, and it will drip so bad it will drown many, many bees. Carry two buckets. One very clean to put the nice honey in, and another to put the dirty honey and old comb in. You can feed the dirty honey back to the bees once they are home. You can either keep the clean honey for yourself, or feed it back to the bees.

    You will likely need a 10 frame hive and maybe a double deep. "two deep boxes"
    A couple of different size knives for cutting the comb out and cutting it to fit the frames.
    A bucket of water and rags for cleaning and washing hands.
    Everything you think you might need, and half the stuff you don't think you will need.

    If at all possible, a helper. A helper can cut an 8 hour job down to 3.
     
  7. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    So I have 4 deeps and 2 shallows, but how would I transport them to the farm? I need to figure out how to do it with the nucs. Right now it s the only way I have to contain the bees for transport.
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Move them at dusk in two deeps, maybe one if it will hold them. They don't need to be contained.
     
  9. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Don't forget camera and have some 1:1 sugar syrup in a spray bottle.
    Also, make it two buckets of water, you will never need that much water as on first cut out.
    Remember, you can do it.:thumbsup:
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    The 4 deeps, is this 10 frame boxes or 5 frame nuc boxes?

    The 10 frame box will be better since you will have comb and bees in one box.
     
  11. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    My small hive cut out

    I did it, i finally kidnaped some bees. I was told by the owner that these bees they have been there for 25 - 30 years she doesn't remember when they moved in she told us her mom always feed wild critters and would put sugar water on the back porch. I don't have the pics and video but when I do I will post it. Nothing could have prepared me for what I saw today and I can't say it was sucess. I have no clue if I gut the queen from this hive but I can say we ran out of frames to put the brood comb on and plenty of young larvea to make a new queen. I had two people putting comb in the frames while I was taking it out then took the box up to the wall and coraled bees in. On this hive I got a lot of bees and left a lot of bees, I have two full coolers of brood, honey and comb and probably a few thousand bees. So the first hive was easy opened a column up and had my way it was easy, to remove the comb and bees (this hive was five feet long and about six inches across with a lot of bees). Cool one down one to go. (only in my dreams) I start to open up the wall and kept cutting the siding and cutting and cutting till I was at the top of the ladder. I thought to myself there is no way this hive is this big. When I started to pull the siding off I new I was in way over my head (note to self do not say omg when opening up a hive it has an unsettling effect on the by standers). This hive is two feet across and the point where I could no longer reach anything was about twelve feet high and the hive didn't stop there. I was able to remove a lot of bees and comb. Is the size of this wall hive normal? Also noted on the wall hive I saw no mites and one shb. On the column hive no mites and a couple of shb. So I guess if your gonna break your cherry go big or go home.:thumbsup:
     

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  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Beautiful hive. Now go back with a taller ladder and finish the job. It will be much easier when you go back. The job is 2/3 done now.

    How about 2 full sections?

    [​IMG]

    and over the window....

    [​IMG]

    All 3 of these pics are the same cutout. I will admit, tho, I had some cute help with it.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    That was a jim-dandy cut out. That is a pretty big colony for sure, a bee vac would have helped with the "crowd control" as I call it.

    waitin' on that video :lol:
     
  14. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    cooler bees

    Ok, yes I know I was ill prepared for yesterday. After filling all my frames and boxes from this cut out I still had several 5 gallon buckets and coolers full of comb. I used the buckets for food for the bees at the farm and took the two coolers back to the house. I opened the coolers up this morning and was greeted by a lot of bees, so I cracked the lid on both coolers to see what would happen. The red cooler only is being robbed from, the green cooler is protecting its self many dead bees that are almost black. The bees in the green cooler are protecting it, but are calm enough that I can walk up to it unprotected and open it and they don't care. Eish what have I gotten my self into? and what do i do next?
     
  15. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Sounds like a pretty good mess!

    I would think that at this point, since you are unsure if you got the queen or not, that hopefully there were eggs in the hive or hives you set up, they will make a new queen. Check on them in about a week for eggs or a queen cell.

    red cooler....since they are robbing from it, I like to lay the comb out on an old trailer to give them access to it and keep them from drowning in the bottom of a bucket.

    green cooler....would do the same thing but look for the queen.

    Not sure if any of the brood is worth saving now, could have put it in frames as soon as you got home and could have maybe saved it. Have done that several times when I have run out of frames. At least open the coolers and let the bees fly out before you have an even bigger mess, do so at least 25 yards away from your hives to cut down on a robbing frenzy. The bees that are black looking overheated and died.

    Kind of sad, not flaming you in the least so don't take it that way, but hopefully a good learning experience and not to be repeated. Cut outs aren't for everyone, they are hot, hard, dirty, time consuming and sometimes can be over whelming. At best you could have left when you ran out of frames and returned the next day to finish up. Just watching a 10 minute video of others doing cut outs never really shows the hours that were put into it.

    Better luck next time.
     
  16. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    my bad G3 the coolers are at my house and the hives are at the farm. Four out of the six have already started queen cells. The question was what to do with the bees that came with the cooler so to speak? I am really new to this, the first time I worked with bees was this cut out and I know I made several mistakes. Just trying to figure out what the next move is on the bees at the house, as the bees at the farm seem to be doing ok.
     
  17. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Well the bees are goners unless they have a hive to return to. Will be hard for them to live in a closed cooler with their comb in a pile.

    Again not trying to bash what you did, just trying to help you out a little. Like I said it can be over whelming at times.
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    How far away is the farm. What should be done is carry the coolers to the farm and release the bees in the bee yard. They will find a hive to take up with.
     
  19. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    No queen in the cooler, I took them back to the farm today and put them in the bee yard. How loud should a hive be? At ten feet away I can hear them buzzing normal? I ment to take a picture of the bee yard but when I realized that I had not I already had put the mule away in the machine shed. So If you look really close you'll never see them because they are 1000 yards after the bend in the woods :lol:
     

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  20. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I see them over there, by the tree with the knot hole.