I am new at this. Looking for advice.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Ingimundur, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. Ingimundur

    Ingimundur New Member

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    Hi everybody. I am a livestock farmer in the western Catskills here in New York State, at about 2000 feet. For years we have had a wild beehive in a old Mable tree about 40 feet from our front door. Nobody has ever been bothered and this is a big hive, the traffic in and out like into Manhattan about 20 feet up in the tree. About two weeks ago we found a swarm by the tree and a friend lent us a super. I put them into it. Later I put another super on top of it and every thing seems to be honky dory.

    Now for the questions:

    Am I right in thinking that these bees are adapted to our area and we should try stick to them, also I don´t want any killer bees on my farm, would not want to see after may heard of cattle stampeding down the road. These bees seem to be calm and nice, warn me gently if I stand to long by their hive by buzzing by my ear. Also when I put the new super on top of the old one, nobody got excited. Maybe this is all normal, but I do think about these killer-bees ones in a while, are they still only down in Mexico?

    Am I right in thinking, like I do with my live stock, that every hive is different, that if these bees are healthy I should try to build up my stock from them or should I get other stock, are wild bees just wild bees and useless?

    Sorry seems like I put this thread in the wrong place, a special place for us beginners.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Welcome to the forum, glad to have you aboard. :hi:

    I think you are so far north that you wouldn't have AHB issues (Africanized Honey Bees, the correct name for "killer bees" which is a sensationalized name)
    If this swarm came from a hive in that tree and they have been around for a long time I would say you have just caught some bees with great genetics. Honeybees are not the nasty bugs that some make them out to be. If they are allowed to do the one thing they desire, work, they will almost always cause you little in the way of problems. It sounds as if you have just stumbled onto a great situation to start a fantastic hobby, :thumbsup:
     

  3. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Hello, and welcome to the forum. AHB have been in the US for quite some time, and have advanced well up into Texas west to California East to Florida. I was in Upstate NY awhile ago, and can say with a degree of confidence that AHB will never advance as far as NY state. Note, nasty bees don't have to be AHB lol quite the contrary several strains of bees can be very miserable to work with, but you have a remedy for that namely to requeen and within 60 days, the entire disposition should change.
    Enjoy keeping bees, and don't worry relax all will be fine.
    Barry
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    The bees that are in the tree split and you actually have the old queen from the tree in your new hive. The change in the genetics would be in the tree since it is a new queen. Next spring set up a bait hive and you might catch another swarm from the tree. Sounds like you are starting off on a good hobby.

    I would not worry at all about AHB.

    Welcome to the forum :hi:
     
  5. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Welcome to the forum! :) My advice to you is read everything you can get your hands on. There are a lot of good books out there and a lot of great info on this forum. It's not rocket science, but there are basics you need to know.

    Good luck!
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You have the best start in beekeeping a person could ask for.

    1. A proven strain of local bees.

    2. A local beekeeper willing to lend a helping hand.

    3. This forum.

    It don't get no better............
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    welcome ingimundur!
    "Am I right in thinking that these bees are adapted to our area and we should try stick to them"

    "if these bees are healthy I should try to build up my stock from them or should I get other stock, are wild bees just wild bees and useless?

    what iddee said, 'a proven strain of local bees' and you didn't even have to pay for them!
     
  8. Ingimundur

    Ingimundur New Member

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    Hey, I feel I walked into the place where everybody knows your name, thank you very much. Fascinating, so I have the old queen and a new one in the old hive. Baithive, I do have a super sitting by the old hive, is that what you call a bait hive? Are bait hives different?
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If the super has a bottom, top, and entrance, with old comb inside, it is a bait hive.

    Yes, we know each by name and sometimes things about them they wish we didn't. :D

    Welcome, and hope you like it here.
     
  10. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Welcome to the forum! You surely did a find a great friendly forum to glean some wisdom from. You probably did stumble upon a fantastic hobby you never thought to be this interesting. And the best part? You are going to have some tasty, health beneficial golden honey to consume. You wouldn't have had access to it before up in the tree.... Hoping you decide to stick around...Dave
     
  11. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

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    Welcome. This is a great forum. Beekeeping is amazing and addicting!:thumbsup:
     
  12. Ingimundur

    Ingimundur New Member

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    Hobby? As a farmer I am somewhat obsessed. I am into direct marketing www.springlakefarmny.com and think maybe the honey could fit in somewhere, maybe as a sweetener in the sausage or something. A friend of ours started making apple cider and in a very short time he seems to have something going, hard cider, nothing like the drug bissness I guess. I am originally from Iceland, no honeybees there, but the Icelandic sagas are filled with tales of mead the drink our ancestor in Norway drank as they pillaged Evrope, maybe I could get something going there :thumbsup:. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mead
     
  13. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Welcome to your new hobby, and, if you're like most of us, it will soon be your new passion. You've found the right place to hang your hat. A whole bunch of friendly folks and a few old curmudgeons (not mentioning any names :lol: ) We like to talk bees and have fun. Don't be afraid to ask questions.
     
  14. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I have not been a member of this forum very long, but it seems like a top notch board. Very nice people here...and they actually know what they are talking about. You can get a lot of help right here.