I am new to the forum ... please help.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by riverwalker76, Aug 6, 2010.

  1. riverwalker76

    riverwalker76 New Member

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    I have been reading up on beekeeping for 6 months or so now, and plan on obtaining my equipment this Fall. I will order my equipment next month. Put it together, and anticipate my bees and queen arrival in the Spring.

    I have had a few concerns about my hive placement. I live on 6 acres, but all of it I maintain with weekly mowing. This leads me to my questions.

    1) Will bees attack if you are mowing around their hive? Will the entire hive attack creating a swarm situation?

    2) If my dogs, German Shepherds, get too close to the hive ... will the bees attack my dogs?

    Thanks in advance for any comments or answers. I cannot find the answers to these questions anywhere, so I thought I'd join and ask here.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    1... The bees will send out guards to an engine. How many depends on a lot of variables. It is best to wear a veil when mowing next to the hives.
    NO, it will not be a swarming mass of bees. Just enough to repel the supposed attack. I mow around mine on a regular basis.

    2...Your dogs will visit the hive and they and the bees will come to an understanding. Then the dogs will know and heed how close they can get.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    river welcome to the forum you couldnt have stumbled into a better group of people. Hope to see ya active on the forum. Now the good thing about beekeeping is you can ask 10 different keeps a question and get 11 answers and 20 arguments on their way being right. So here goes my 2 cents. Bees are like humans they have their good days and the have their bad days. Vibration from the mowers has been known to agitate bees. but again it depends on the day I got hives that I can mow around and not have any problems then the next week they will come out and let you know they dont want their yard mowed. Unless you have an overly agressive hive I wouldnt worry to much about it myself. But every body is different. As far as them swarming situation they can gang up on you if they get agitates enough. Best thing to do when this happens is run thru some brush to get them off you they have trouble flying through it. The dogs well I got 2 great danes the female learned the first day we brought her home to stay away from the white boxes. The male hes been called a lot of things but smart isnt one of them. He keeps us entertained with his antics but I garauntee that if he goes outside he will still go stick his nose right in the front door of the hive and get it again he just wont learn. But most dogs are quick learners so I wouldnt worry to much about the dogs they will figure it out. again welcome to the forum and welcome to a new addiction.
     
  4. riverwalker76

    riverwalker76 New Member

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    Hey Riverrat .... good to see you on here too! I may be bugging you with more questions before it's over with. :D
     
  5. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I usually don't wear any protection if I am mowing with my walk behind mower... but I do wear a veil if I am using my riding mower. The bees for some reason seem to dislike the riding mower a little more than the other one and will occasionally ping me to let me know I need to back off with it. It's never a swarm situation, at most I've had 2 bees buzzing around me while mowing.

    I can not guarantee the bees won't attack your dogs, but my bees have never attacked any of my neighbors' pets which include more cats than should be legally allowed and several dogs that wander through. The cats will often sleep beneith the hives on hot days or when it's raining and frequently jump up on the hives and the bees seem to just ignore them.
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Bring it on we all love the attention here. :yahoo:
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    I have 39 hives between the front middle and back yard here. I mow around them all the time with out any trouble, but there are things you need to learn.
    (1.Do the mowing around the hives when you are not all sweaty, they seem to really like the minerals in the sweat.
    (2.Do not allow the exhust to blow into the hive, You sure would not like it if some one pointed their exhust at your door and filled your house with the fumes.
    (3. Do not basng againest the hive or the stand it may be on, Again you would not like it if some thing kept viberating your house either.
    (4. There are some days you just stay away like over cast days, they seem to be cranky on over cast days.

    I try not to discharge the grass on the landing boards too, but it isn't as bad as the exhust thing.

    For some reason the bees here would leave the yellow lab alone if we walked by the hives but the choclate lab soon learned to leave a wide berth around the hives. Like about 30 yards.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    First off hello and welcome to the forums.
    though few people have buckwheat around thier house anymore, and flowering crop that ceases nectar production at certian times like buckwheat produces predigiously, but shuts down around noon--when they do the field bees have nothing to do and they are the aggressive ones so if your around flowering plants that are time of the day oriented nectar producers--then mowing your yard during the atrifically induced dearth of nectar will probabily generate a more severe response from otherwise idle bees.
    Barry :drinks:
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    welcome aboard.... and perhaps you might want to consider adding a Florida moving screen/robber screen to the items you might want to incorporate into your hives. this seems to me to be one of the most positive things you can do to limit the defensive nature of bees.

    like several folks here have said.... most days 'the girls' are like little lambs and on rare occasions they are more like wolves. I have never seen european bees mob anything unless they were highly provoked or upset just previously by some nasty intruder like a skunk. at least part of what you need to learn as a 'beekeeper' is the signs that an intruder has been stirring thing up and how to respond to the intruder.