I dropped a big load this morning

Discussion in 'Bees' started by BjornBee, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    This was a load of nucs that were sent out to greener pastures earlier today. Most are built up and I just did not have a chance to put in standard equipment. This may lessen some of the competition at the home yard, which still has 10 full size hives and 75 nucs.

    There are 22 nucs in the truck.

    You can see the spacers on top for feeding fall fondant.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Looks like you were doing some newspaper combines there.

    Hope they all make it through the winter, should come out smelling like a rose this spring.

    G3
     

  3. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Nice, why are the spacers different thicknesses? Are you just using what lumbers available or was it for a reason?

    Charles
     
  4. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    I think that you are correct, but most of them look like they have a second story, a nuc super.

    Bjornbee,
    They look like 4 framers, right? Do you put 12 of these on a pallet so they can keep each other from being chilled? What is your wintering technique? I have quite a few 5 frame nucs and am planning on taking them south w/ the rest of the bees. I'll need the equipment down there anyway.
     
  5. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Yeah, most were made from the ends of board stock that was cut off in making the various size bee boxes. No particular reason.

    I had bought some deep nuc boxes and cut them down to mediums, leaving a nice spacer. And some were budget nucs with a bad spot or a knot that after cutting them out, I then cut the excess wood down to spacer size removing any bad areas. Not too much goes to waste.
     
  6. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I'll pull queens in late summer and then combine them with the queenright colony next to the one I just pulled the queen out of. Some also were built up by already having a second box on top as this is a great way to draw foundation throughout the summer.

    I'll slide them together but that is about it for winter. Except for last winter, I've had really good success in wintering nucs in years past. Last year, we had a week in January that had -5 at night and highs in the 10-15 range. We had not seen temps like that around here in 20 years. It just knocked out the small clusters that really had a hard time after a very poor fall buildup.

    This year, I'm going into winter with most nucs having at least one additional booster box more than last year. All the boxes I added in the past 2 months was drawn comb and they really packed in much more than last year when I was still "dreaming" they could make wax in the fall. No such dreams this year!