I feel bad for laughing.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by letitbee, Apr 30, 2012.

  1. letitbee

    letitbee New Member

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    I just had to share this with other beeks who have dogs. I let the dogs out this morning and went to the woodpile to get logs for the woodburner and when I came around the corner, I saw my bloodhound running in circles near my hives so I automatically figured out what happened. I have tried to keep the dogs away from the hives and they have been good about staying away but being a bloodhound, my poor girl, I guess, couldn't help but smell the hives and one of bees took exception to it. We all know that when you get stung, you have to scrape the stinger out but I couldn't find where she had gotten it. She would stand there for a second until the venom sac would pump a bit and take off running in circles again with me running after her to try to find the stinger. I can only wonder what the neighbors were thinking if they saw what was going on. Me in my pajamas and slippers trying to find a stinger in a dogs behind and she is freaking out and running around in circles in the yard with me holding on to her tail. She is fine and I hope she learned a lesson but I feel kind of bad about laughing but it had to look bad. Trying to teach a bloodhound anything is like trying to push a car up a hill with a rope, but I bet she understands now. One of my lighter bee moments:smile::smile:
     
  2. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

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    Very cute story! Thank you for posting :grin:
    I do have a Siberian Husky and he shows no interest, but a neighboring farmer did stop by with his sweet little black and tan hound. Poor baby stuck her nose right into the hive entrance...same result..and we couldn't find the stinger :( I told him to watch her for swelling and he may find it. He didn't mind - thank goodness and even offered for me to put a hive on his clover field - (for his cattle feed), He is only a half mile away, but says he hasn't seen any (of my) honey bees there. I am going to try to start another hive and take him up on the offer. Down side, he is selling 53 acres (most of his land) This land is half of a 2 mile circle surrounding our property - hope a honey bee lover buys it!

    And letitbee, I hope your little girl is feeling better, too.
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Great story!
    I have found that a benadryl works well when my rottweiler mix catches a bee just wrong when trying to eat it. My border collie/german shepherd mix has mastered the art of bee-eating without getting stung. I don't plant bee forage in the backyard unless it is out of dog reach, and I don't let my dogs near my hives, needless to say...

    Gypsi
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    My English Setter birddog will go on point over a bee working flowers and when it flys off he will grab and eat it.:roll: Been trying to break him of it with no luck.When i took him to the vet, he said Reb had a big calous in the roof of his mouth and didn't know what caused it, i told him of Reb's sport:lol:. Jack
     
  5. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    We have a Skye Terrier that is completely black. She already got popped once and now knows the bees are there but for some reason she seems to like running directly in front of the hives.

    I love watching the landing board when she does. All of the guard bees see her coming and rush out to the front of the landing board. Once past, the guard bees come marching back to the hive body. All the while, I am sitting less than a foot away!

    The Benedryl after any sting is a very good tip (both for dogs and beeks!). Being an anti-histamine, it helps to prevent the immune system from producing (or over-producing) long term anti-bodies. This will help to prevent the later development of an allegic response (caused by over-production of or production of the wrong types of anti-bodies).

    People (and dogs) are rarely, if ever, allegic to thier first sting.
     
  6. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    My German Shepherd is an artist when it comes to bee eating. I'll post a video next time I see her doing it. I was hoping the chickens would detract from her interest in the bees but I think she likes to protect the chickens.