I guess I didn't learn my lesson the first time

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by reidi_tim, May 5, 2012.

  1. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    My son turned on to a colony in a dead tree at his gfiends house. The entrance is about 12 feet up and the bees are pissy as all get out. My son lifted me up to check out the hive with a tractor with a front loader ( probably not OSHA approved ) but when I got to looking at the entrance the bees where not happy they where all over me. So my plan of attack is going to be the night before they cut the tree down cover the entrance with a piece of plywood, the entrance is about 2 inches in the middle of a knot hole. They have a bucket truck so my thoughts were to have them cut 10 feet above the entrance and drop the top of the tree, then use some wrap some straps around the remaining stump and then drop the last 22 feet. This colony has been hanging out there for the last 3 years so I'm hoping that this will leave enough of the tree to keep the colony contained so I can do the cut out on the ground. Any thoughts? I took this picture from the ground didn't really trust the boy enough to bring the camera up with me in the front loader, at 42 I don't bounce as well as I use to:rotfl:
    . bee tree2.jpg
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Instead of nailing a board to the front of the entrance just stuff a rag in it or use an old bed sheet and wrap it around the tree and secure with duct tape. The bed sheet ad duct tape is quick and easy to contain bees in an odd shaped what ever.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Are you going to do the cut-out on the spot or bring the part of the tree containing the bees home to do it? If they could just cut above and below where you think the colony might be and lower that piece to the ground it would be gentler than dropping the tree. Iddee has more experience at bee trees than me, I have none.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  5. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    Perry I'm going to do it onsite, I have no desire to pack around a log that out weighs me. The boss lady works for a hvac company I was wondering if I used their laser point infrared thermometer could it give me the extent of the hive:???:
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Infrared is cool. And I'll second the bedsheet or rag idea, I've tried screening and flat wood over a bee tree entrance. Underlayment fabric shoved in the hole finally did the trick.

    Gypsi
     
  7. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    How soon are they cutting the tree down? I mean, if you have a little time, why not just trap them out where they are?
     
  8. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    How soon are they cutting the tree down? I mean, if you have a little time, why not just trap them out where they are? I couldn't tell from your post whether the girlfriend's people are taking the tree down and you want to get the bees out first or if you are just going to cut it down specifically just to get the bees. If the latter, you could use open brood to trap out the queen and enough bees to start a nice nuc, and leave the tree bees to raise a new queen. You could do that several times a year and consider the tree a constant source of new starts for you. Or, like I said, just get the queen and all the bees and then no more bees in the tree.
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  10. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    I guess I can't speak to it from personal experience yet, but I'm working on my own adaptation of the Cleo C. Hogan contraption that he has used for decades, apparently, to use open brood to get the queen out of trees. I know it's been talked about a little on this board.
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Yes, and he is the only one so far that I have read of being successful. I am still waiting for a few others to report their success. Until then, I will stick to my way.

    If you read my posts, I state that this is only one way, and their are likely many more, but I have yet to see other ways that multiple beeks have had success with.
     
  12. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    I am wanting to make sure that I get the queen, or more to the point her genetics. My gut feeling is that if I can start with a genetic back round that has survived with no human intervention that they will be more stable bees to work with.
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a couple of Hogan traps going,
    But the lack of fresh brood and my work
    Schedule have held things up.
    I am cutting out the one in Arlington,
    The height is prohibitive, bees keep
    Making new openings. The bee tree
    Stump in my garden is a better
    Candidate. Just have to pour cement
    Around the base. They like bottom
    Openings.
    Will let you know if I get the queen
    Gypsi
     
  14. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    So this is a go on f-day, bestest present my son has ever gotten me :grin:
     
  15. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    Took a lot longer then I thought, the biggest problem the tree was hanging over a lot of fencing. They had an old bucket truck ( old as in it ran like it wanted to! :eek: would be raising the bucket at a steady pace and the it would take off at full speed, so instinct told you to release the joy stick then you would come to a sudden halt fifty feet of the ground swaying back and forth ) we used to take the tree down. So it was my son ( TC ), his g-fiends brother in law ( Jush ) and me, when we were ready to drop the section with the bees I said there are jackets and gloves in the truck, of course these are manly men and had no use for that sort of stuff. Used a backhoe to support the section with the hive but they were not to gentle on setting it on the ground. So the inevetable happened first Jush was running away swinging his arms about screaming no sooner then TC was rolling around laughing there he went doing the same bee dance :chased:. My wife is telling I'm not right because I still LMAO :rolling::rolling: when typing this it was to funny. So Tc comes back to help me split the log with jacket , veil and gloves, Josh on the other hand tells TC that his dad needs to be put in a home with constant supervision, and did want to back out and play. So T and I stared to pull the comb and seperate, brood and honey. I was able to make up 5 frames of brood capped and uncapped with empty cells on one side. When I found the queen she was covered in honey so I put here in a cage with some workers who started to clean her up. The hive was maybe six inches by 6 feet, left the nuc on the tree stump to give the bees a chance to regroup. How long do I wait before I move them down to the farm? They are ok with the bees staying till It's best for the bees to be move. And I'm still cracking my self up thinking about the boys running like scared school girls
     
  16. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Leave them until they quit working the tree remains for honey, then move them at night. Most likely Tues. or Wed. night.
     
  17. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Those manly men are something else! I'm laughing out loud. Most of the people that have helped me are grateful for a veil, LOL, having a healthy respect for stingers, and a fear of whether they might be allergic. Glad it went well.

    I gave up on the Hogan Swarm Trap idea for my bee stump, and just moved the darned bees. The weed count in the garden and the irritability of the bees had a lot to do with it. And the stalking bee. With the stump on its side they finally settled for robbing it out and moving the honey to their new hive.

    I second the moving at night idea. How far are you moving them?

    Gypsi
     
  18. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    Gypsi the bees are about thirty miles from home and the another fifty miles to the farm, so my question is when you say " night " how late is that? Iddee what is the tell tale sighns that the bees are done with the left over?? I worked my but off today to get this colony so want to try and do the best I can and not repeat my failure of the past...
     
  19. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd say half an hour after sunset at the earliest. 4:30 a.m. seems to be optimal, at least in Texas summer. But I will defer to Iddee - I'm a relative new beek. I do know that 2 pm is a really BAD time to move a hive.

    And the farther the distance the better, keeps them from returning to their prior location. Anything over 10 miles seems to be good.

    Gypsi
     
  20. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    Can't offered no advice on this but I will say I think you done very good. Good luck saving the honey and bees.