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Remove the infected combs and freeze them. Then move the hive into the sun. They are in too much shade.
I can speak from experience that this worked for me and the same fellow gave me the same advice. Thanks Iddee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Iddee. I pulled all the frames I could find with larvae on them, which turned out to be 5 frames and the 6th frame only had about 1/4 of the first side drawn out the next 3 frames were completely empty. I took the slatted rack off because it covered in them. I put the unaffected frames in a new box and placed it on the old stand. I then found the queen put her in the new box, and then knocked all the bees off of each frame onto the ground just in front of the hive, so as not to put in the larvae back into the new box. Tonight after they are all tucked in bed I'll move them to the other side of the house where they can get a good 6 hours of direct sun.

Hopefully they can rebuild and recover from this.


Those larvae are nasty little [email protected]$tard$....

2012-05-29_18-51-32_909.jpg 2012-05-29_18-49-51_176.jpg 2012-05-29_18-50-59_74.jpg 2012-05-29_18-51-17_663.jpg
 

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the frames in the picture look to be quite reusable after freezing.

reduce the hive to the smallest size box they will fit into... ie crowd somewhat. after you move the hive into somewhat sunnier spot I would consider feeding just a bit. I would suspect that the hive/nuc quit growing... likely when they you hit a dearth or dry spell??? <also likely in the not so distant past or the hive would be history by now.

a snip...
so as not to put in the larvae back into the new box

tecumseh:
the stuff you found on the slatted rack and the larvae should be burned and not tossed on the ground. the shb pupates in the ground so by dumping you are promoting the next generation of those little nasties. here a nice sized fire ant mound kind of accomplishes the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
the frames in the picture look to be quite reusable after freezing.....
I thought i would cut out the really nasty places and then put the frames back in the hive so they can have the honey. How long do I need to allow them to stay in the freezer and then how long do i need to thaw them for before putting them back in the hive?

....reduce the hive to the smallest size box they will fit into... ie crowd somewhat....
I feel relatively sure all of the adults are gone.... I placed traps in the hive last week and they were loaded down today with deads.

...the stuff you found on the slatted rack and the larvae should be burned and not tossed on the ground. the shb pupates in the ground so by dumping you are promoting the next generation of those little nasties. here a nice sized fire ant mound kind of accomplishes the same thing.
I was planning on treating the ground in about 20ft radius after I move the hive from it's current location.

Speaking of moving the hive.... I was going to do that tonight but there is about 100 or so bees still hanging around the outside of the hive right at the entrance.... should I give them a day or so to relax before I move them or go ahead move them now?
 

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Move them now. Put empty box at old
Site. Collect stragglers
 

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if you are not moving the hive far they will find the new spot... they have quite acute smelling and will find their queen. for some short period they may be some confusion as to 'where is home' but they will find their way back and fairly quickly.

a snip..
I thought i would cut out the really nasty places and then put the frames back in the hive so they can have the honey.

tecumseh:
after feeding whatever is left and getting them upright again and building population just insert the prior frozen frames and 'the girls' will clean up and toss out what ever they cannot use and will use everything they possible can. several million years of experience has taught them to be quite accomplished at house keeping chores.

you freeze to kill the eggs of the shb that you cannot see and which most hives will have difficulty getting ahead of. do place in a plastic bag prior to setting in the freezer since a lot of very nasty stuff will fall out of the frames in the freezing process.

here some soil types are worst than other. I would suspect the loose sandy soil that is typical of much of Florida is a large benefit to the shb.
 

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Gator, I have found the best trap, if you want to use them, are the beetle blasters. They fit in between the frames and you put a small amount of olive oil, vegetable oil, in to them.

One of my langs hives that I checked today, the trap was full. I would guess around 50-75 beetles in it. I dumped them out, washed out the trap and re-installed it. I'm cheap!! This hive is in the sun for 6-8 hours a day.

I have also found that putting wood ash and lime around the bottom of the hives helps keep them under control.
Robert
 

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I have read and seen on youtube about putting diatomaceous earth around the hive to kill the beetle larvae (along with ants and stuff, too). I have some, but haven't had to use it yet.


[video=youtube;Cyjs0RRI3xc]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cyjs0RRI3xc[/video]
 

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I have these traps in the hive already,but I didn't get them until last week... http://www.gabees.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=41_70&products_id=370

They have caught about 20 or so, so far.

I also spread diatomaceous earth on the ground tonight so we will see how that does.
I don't like the idea of chemicals in the hive unless it is absolutely needed. I didn't think I had a small hive beetle issue yet in my hives as I had only saw a few. The better beetle blaster traps I added only a couple weeks ago have from 10 to 20 in EACH of them (one trap in each hive currently).

These are quite effective and with only vegitable oil have very little chance of contaminating the hive or hive products.

NOTE: I just posted this update on my own observations from these pests. Even if they don't slime you out, they are STILL a major problem in a hive!

http://www.beekeepingforums.com/thr...12-(consolidation-thread)?p=152412#post152412
 

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the frames in the picture look to be quite reusable after freezing.

reduce the hive to the smallest size box they will fit into.

tecumseh:
the stuff you found on the slatted rack and the larvae should be burned and not tossed on the ground. the shb pupates in the ground so by dumping you are promoting the next generation of those little nasties. here a nice sized fire ant mound kind of accomplishes the same thing.
If you don't have a fire ant mound, but you have a chicken coop and hungry hens, bugs and worms are considered a delicacy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well I took the frozen frames out of the freezer and let them sit in the sun for about 2 hrs. I opened the hive back up put them in the center of the box. I put 2 frames(that were still in the hive) with the most built out comb as 1 and two, then the next 5 I put the frozen frames and then 3 frames that they had started building on in the last two days. I found the queen on what is now frame 1 and I worked backwards from there.

Basically I just started over and completely turned my bee's lives upside.... literally and figuratively. Hopefully they will make a full recovery and get things headed in the right direction now.
 
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