I need my Bee Quick!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Tia, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Yesterday, after I had blown as many bees out as I could, I had put 2 honey boxes between 2 triangle escapes and left them overnight, confident that the cool night (in the sixties! Yay!) would send them packing. No dice! When I went out this morning, there was an amazingly large congregation on the outside of the escape. My first thought was that I had accidentally taken off brood, and (God forbid) the queen. I was pretty sure I had thoroughly checked this box back at the hive and that it was brood/queen free, but I'm getting old and I have a tendency to doubt myself. So before I got out the blower for a second attempt, I decided to (once again) go through the box, frame-by-frame, to make sure I didn't need to put it back where it came from.
    All of the frames are heavy with honey, with no sign of SHB, the queen or brood (thank God). About one-third of the honey on three of the frames in the middle of the box is uncapped. Question: Can I go ahead and harvest all of it, or only the fully capped frames? My recollection is that if 70% is capped, you're good to go, but I'd like confirmation if you can (once again, I'm getting old. . .forgetting things. . .I'll also check my notebook though!).
    Anyway, I decided the reason there are so many bees is because usually I first hit them with Bee Quick, and then move the boxes to the escapes. Hoping there will be some to buy and the conference next weekend. Wally, I trust I'll see you there so I can talk your ear off about bees and ask all kinds of questions!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Extract it all. The little that isn't capped shouldn't make that much difference.

    Do you want me to bring a bottle of bee quick with me to the meeting?
     

  3. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Wally, Ainchoo sweet?!?! If you have it to spare, I'll be glad to buy some off you! Can't wait to see you again!

    Thanks, too, for the advice.
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I always ue bee escapes, less stress for bees, one extra trip tp yard, and unless brood in supers, which there should not be--bees will be totally out within 24 hours make certian the telescoping cover sits securely with the inner cover under how ever many supers you wish to remove. Have never had a problem with is and unless you lose it--the beeescapes are quite strudy. I actually failed to read your entire post forgive me--suggest you place empty super under the supers you want to extract from--summer heat may be keeping the bees wanting to expand over larger area to have space to ventilate and cool off.
    Barry :drinks:
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    long ago during one of my various tours with commercial beekeepers I was introduced to bee go... god bless the man (that being Jim Fischer) for making bee quick. now today all I need is a nice sunny day to use it...

    as to honey in the cells and uncapped. if the nectar is uncured then in will easily splash out of the cell via 'the splash test'... i.e. hold the uncapped side downward and with a flick of your rist give the frame a quick snap. if a lot of syrup splashes out then it is likely to thin. cured honey will not be dislodged so easily. do this directly 'overtop' the box and the bees will clean up the splash mess pretty quick... not 'overtop' at the wrong time can encourage robbing episodes.
     
  6. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Barry, when I harvest, I don't use the bee escapes on the hives. Rather, usually, I drive the girls down into the hive with Bee Quick then take the boxes off, covering them as I go, so no bees can reenter. Every hive that I take a box from gets an empty box to fill. Then I take all the boxes I've robbed and put them on a stand by my honey house door, with one escape under and one on top. I tape the boxes together, so no one can "squeeze through the cracks" then hope for a cold night so remaining bees will go home. The next morning I carry the boxes in the honey house and get to work.

    This year I'm having a terrible problem with yellow jackets! They don't usually show up until next month, so I know it's going to be a real problem this year. So far so good, but I've already been stung by yj's about 6 times. I've hung my homemade yj traps which work like a charm; I just have to be patient, I guess.

    Yesterday I harvested 2 shallows and somehow got 66 lbs! They were both 9-frame and the girls had drawn the comb out to the point where there was no space between! When I uncapped, I cut the caps off level with the frame, and some of those cappings looked more like candy bars! There were 2 frames that were mostly uncapped and I worried about fermentation should I use them, so, as you said, tecumseh, I did "the splash test" and didn't use them. So from 14 frames I got 66 lbs. That doesn't sound possible, even to me, but it's the truth!

    Then, keeping with you all's advice, I put the empty combs in the freezer just to ensure again SHB. But I do have to say, I saw absolutely no evidence of SHB in these two boxes.
     
  7. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I have never doubted that bee go works, but always wondered why it doesn't drive the bees out of the hive entirely. I have alwayd preferred the passive techniques, for me anyway less fuss, and the bees never stayed in supers more then 24 - 35 hours before enitrely vacated. Only execption to that is when I failed to use queen excluder and got chimney brood to into honey super. 66 lbs from less then 2 shallows must be some dense honey.
    :yahoo:
    Barry
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if you leave bee go or bee quick on long enough it will drive the bees out the front entrance.

    as far as my own experience goes a high velocity leaf blower and a stand with canvas slide is the quickest and least disturbing means of removing bees from a super. we routinely used a leaf blower when air temperatures dropped too low to allow bee go to work effectively.
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    When i rob my bees 60 miles north of home, i always take my ramp with side rails, If the sun doesn't shine the bee go or bee quick doesn't work to good. I place the ramp against the landing board and shake and brush the bees off each frame onto the ramp, it's funny to watch them march up the ramp into the front entrance of the hive. It takes a little more time ( my uncle use to say, what's time to a hog) but works great, the down side is that you usually take a few hits, :mrgreen: but it's worth it :thumbsup: . Jack

    P.S. my response to my uncle was, when a feeder hog got between 250 lbs. to 300 bls. his time was short. :mrgreen: