I want some Chickens!

Discussion in 'The Rural Life' started by Eddy Honey, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    She could more exceptable to mites and with a little exposed area they others would peck that area making it worse.I was going to sud just that you could knit a sweater for her. I want to see photos! Use to have to clean out all the chicken shit and white wash the floors walls and ceiling to control the mites.
     
  2. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    You could build them a dusting box. We used to use a mixture of Sevin (I wouldn't use it now) and wood ashes.

    My grandma had an old hen that had it whole tail pecked off, not just the feathers either. It survived but, she sure was a strange looking bird. Injured chickens wound up living under a potato crate for a while to heal up. Then it might be the stew pot if Grandma deemed it necessary.
     

  3. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Some breeds of chickens are much more inclined to feather picking. I had Wyandottes that right from chicks would pluck feathers from each other for entertainment. Any visible sore gets picked on and lead to cannibalism if you dont separate the victim. I guess it is natures way of sorting out the weak from the genetic pool. I saw a surveyor spray a shot of orange paint on a seagull and the others sure harassed and battered it..... cant have any non conformists in our midst, now can we!

    I have a few of last years hens that have been laying for a year and now molting. They just recently quit laying and had been getting thin shelled and rough eggs. They sure look different than their daughters that came on line the week before christmas.
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I got out on BYC and was told that hens should lay for 5 years or some such nonsense, and that I must be doing something wrong for my 18 month old hens to stop laying. The hens were production reds.

    I spent a fortune trying to feed production reds up to laying decent hardshelled eggs in their 2nd year. Calcium, mealyworms, yogurt, you name it. Between heat, drought, moult, in October I culled 3 to see what was going on IN the birds, and found one had fat wrapped around her heart (the one with the rattiest feathers and comb) , 2 of the 3 were out of forming yolks (the one with the bad heart was one), the 3rd bird I shouldn't have culled as she had a lineup of 4 yolks in orderly size preparing to lay. The best looking 4th bird, nicest feather and comb at the time, I still have, she laid a few eggs in the winter of 11/12 but she hasn't laid an egg since spring. When she laid maybe 2 eggs. She is 3 years old. That's ok, she is extra eyes for predators when I let them loose in the yard.
     
  5. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Gypsi, yes I have seen the old age layer hen myth too. Some breeds do lay older and we had barred rocks to a fair age but that heavy a bird not worth its keep if it is laying 3 or 4 eggs a week. I tried them again about 10 years ago but found out that supplier had a high incedence of odd and irregular shaped eggs. Not a general trait of BR's but shows how individuals experience starts urban legends some times. I had some backyard sourced orpingtons that laid very puny eggs; dont know if that is typical for the breed or not.

    If a person wants some eggs but mostly hens as pets and an identity thing, almost any breed or mongrel works. If you want high return of eggs per pound of feed and uniform appearance an internal quality it is hard to beat hens from a company that supplies the dedicated layers. I have kept them through molts and percentage lay is never as high second time around and the appearance drops. I keep the irregulars and misfit eggs for our use and purty up the selection in the cartons I sell or provide friends.
     
  6. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I keep their are clean with wood pellets that turn to sawdust mixed with diametacious earth (sp). Saw her cussin' at the rooster today but he may have had another motive :wink:
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Gypsi those that told you "that hens should lay for 5 years or some such nonsense," are the same type of people that say a queen can lay for (the highest I have heard is) 8 years. There is a reason for menopause so baby's are born from 20 and 30 year olds not women in their 50 and 60's. Creators are designed to be most vigorous in their youth. So let the young and youth full be the productive ones in life and work hard towards earlier retirement.Just because an older person could enter a beauty contest, or work the stripper pole, or wear a Speedo to the beach doesn't mean we wont to see it.
     
  8. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I never saw a good looking hen that was laying. If she looks like she belongs on a calendar, she aint using her resources to make eggs. Nice sleek, plump hens go good with dumplings.:thumbsup:
    IMHO if you are trying to make money on eggs, you need to find a niche market. Something like easter egg chickens or organic chickens or heritage breeds, because you cant compete against the corporate farmers.

    An old gentleman once told me;
    " You can't complain about the price of eggs, if you can't stand a little chicken shit in your yard":lol:
     
  9. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

    Messages:
    1,146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    We got another 12 chicks on April First (Yeh, I know :grin:). We ended up calling them the "daffy dozen". We kept them in a coop next to the six "ladies" so they could see each other but not have contact.

    Today we merged the flocks...opened the door between the coops. They merged nicely, with only a few reminders from the ladies as to who was at the top of the pecking order. The only minor problem came when one of the daffy dozen decided to demonstrate that she was #1. She found out quickly that her best rank might be #7. :lol:

    Walt
     
  10. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sorry if somebody just said, but this chickens eat every ant (and other stuff) what is in the apiary, except the bees! This pictures are made in the old apiary of our queen breeder. Angola01.jpg Angola02.jpg Angola03.jpg Angola04.jpg Angola05.jpg
     
  11. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    We got two new hens this year and the white leghorn is really bully them bad. Waiting to see if she kills them.
     
  12. brendantm130

    brendantm130 New Member

    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    these look like giunnea fowl, not chickens
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

    Messages:
    3,281
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    White Leghorns just have a mean streak:roll:, They would attack our children when they went to the hen house to gather eggs? A funny story, i came home from work and seen 6 white leghorn roosters hanging buy there leg with a coat hanger on the chicken pen fence:???:, I went in the house and ask my son and daughter what was going on, they said they got tied of them white roosters trying to flog them , and was teaching them a lesson (daughter 10 son 5 years old), said they have been there for a couple hours. I told them to take them down, and from then on those roosters would run from them when they went in the pen:lol:. We had better luck with the Domineckers (sp?) and road island red breeds. I'm with you brendantm 103, those do look like a guinea?? Jack
     
  14. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

    Messages:
    385
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Rhode Island Reds for us here also. Have an incubator so do not have to depend on them brooding. Great foragers just like the bees. They do very well on a little cracked corn and the bugs and grasses etc around her. Got 12 chicks from the incubator 3 weeks ago and have 8 more hatching dates with about 7 eggs due each day for a week or so. This insures the flock is laying though out the year. We have not run out of eggs to use or sell since converting to this breed. Tom

    [​IMG]
     
  15. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Portuguese is called "galinha d´angola" what means angolian chicken. They aren´t chicken, but you can eat them, too :) And clean the área!
     
  16. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

    Messages:
    1,146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Here are some of the "daffy dozen" in the outside coop with a couple of the "ladies". The ladies are the ones with the comb.

    Chicks and Chickens.jpg

    Walt
     
  17. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

    Messages:
    1,146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    OK. The young girls are starting to lay, "Squawk. What the heck...Is this coming from me?" :lol: While some eggs are on the ground in any number of places, they are getting the idea of why there are nest boxes. Your quiz for the day, can you tell which eggs are from the mature ladies and which are from the girls? :grin:

    eggs.jpg

    Come on, they're just starting. In a couple of months they'll be better at it. :grin:

    Walt
     
  18. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I remember when I first had chickens, you'd quite often get double yolks from the hens that were just starting to lay.
    I started with Leghorns (waaaay to flighty) then Golden Comets (a nice bird) and then finally switched to Bantams (the most fun and hilarious to have around).
     
  19. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

    Messages:
    3,281
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I agree with my buddy perry:shock:. The Bantams (Banties) are the most fun to have around, the eggs are smaller, the hens are quicker at catching bugs, and the roosters can and will whip any of the bigger roosters, especially if you put a eye dropper of Dads cough medicine down them.:lol: Don't try this if your under 12 years of age, it will set your Butt on fire.:eek: Jack
     
  20. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

    Messages:
    385
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    LOL....i would put any of my older Rhode Iland Red roosters against the banties.....lol Tom