I'd like your thoughts

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Tia, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    It's exactly a month since we installed my friend's nuc into a 10-frame deep. In that time, they've drawn out 4 frames and filled them with nectar and pollen. Only one side of one frame has capped brood, larva and eggs--good, tight pattern. In the center is a supercedure cell. Lots of bees; can't find the queen, but know she's been there within the past 3 days because of the eggs. Left the supercedure cell there.

    I know they're building up way too slowly but don't understand why. What would you do? Let the new queen supercede? Buy a new queen? Give them another frame of brood?

    Thoughts, please.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    When you installed the nuc, you left the pollen frame and honey frame next to the brood. You put the empty frames outside the "nest". She won't cross the pollen and honey frame to lay eggs. Put the empties inside the honey/pollen frames with the brood frames and she will expand quickly.
     

  3. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Iddee, you are a bloody genius! I think I learn more from you than any other beek on any beekeeping forum (no offense, tecumseh and riverrat)!
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Oh jeez, here we go!

    (Just when we got him to start thinking of himself as a mere Mortal instead of "The Bee Wisperer".)

    :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    he just beats us to the punch we let him win most the time to keep him playing. but dont tell him that sure would hate to see him take his bees and go home :thumbsup: :drinks:
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    my suggestion would be:


    When you installed the nuc, you left the pollen frame and honey frame next to the brood. You put the empty frames outside the "nest". She won't cross the pollen and honey frame to lay eggs. Put the empties inside the honey/pollen frames with the brood frames and she will expand quickly

    Let us know how it works :D
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Rat, you ain't supposed to tell her I called you to find the answer before posting.
     
  8. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    mere Mortal

    tecumseh:
    there you go... we will not hear the end of this for a looong time!!! probably won't even talk to us mere bee keepers.

    so what does the crowd say??? would you ax that 'superscedure' cell or not?

    I would likely take one more peek for the queen and if I still thought she was there. as I reconfigured this hive (pretty much your perfect scenario of opening up the brood nest) I would ace the cell.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    OOOHHH!!! What a chance for an experiment. I would put the cell and brood on one side of the pollen frame and the queen on the other side with drawn comb and see if they would run two queens in the same hive.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    What a chance for an experiment.

    tecumseh:
    excellent... curious configuration Iddee... might work.

    an up and down reconfiguration with top and bottom entrance on opposite sides of the hive + a queen excluder would be another option. this would almost require a very robust hive close by to boost the two halves.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    But with the hive she has, everything is ready. It will give the queen a place to lay, and let the bees decide if they want one or two queens. The pollen frame should separate the queens and only the workers will decide. If it works, both halves could use pollen from their side of the frame until it became one hive again.

    I think it would be great fun and may DOUBLE boost the hive.
     
  13. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Whoa, whoa, wait a minute! You do realize this isn't my hive and that we're dealing with a newbee here, aren't you? If the hive was in my yard, I might consider doing what Iddee suggests. . .sounds like a great experiment. . .but I just don't think I can go playing with this guy's hive. He lost his one and only hive last year and this year I had to talk him into trying again, so this hive has got to be a success or I'm afraid he'll get totally discouraged and give up. Besides, it's too dang hot to be playing with the bees every day.

    Did mine yesterday, too. They're all going gangbusters and I actually got a laying worker hive to accept a queen and her small baseball size swarm! The big swarm I got is going at lightning speed. My other 3 hives are five boxes each and every box has brood, nectar and honey in it. . .never seen that before. I thought of manipulating frames, but it's too hot. I did move the boxes containing the queens to the bottom on each hive and on a couple, I put in queen excluders under the boxes that are mostly nectar figuring the brood will hatch, they can fill the remaining frames with honey and I can rob them later.
     
  14. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    OK, so you can't this time. It still sounds like a fun thing to try. I may try it on a weak hive next spring. In this case, just put some empties in the nest area and watch them explode.
     
  15. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    dang it I didn't even get a chance to jump in here, been busy baling hay.
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would hope Tia that my question would encourage folks to think of the + and - associated with discovering a 'superscedure' cell and thereby give them something of a mental jump on what they might want to do if they ran into a similar circumstance. Any 'brain storming' from the various members here should simple provide possible options for them to consider.

    For me it is quite simple to make fairly quick decisions in regards to my own bees but very difficult when it come to someones else's hives.
     
  17. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Tecumseh wrote: "For me it is quite simple to make fairly quick decisions in regards to my own bees but very difficult when it come to someones else's hives."

    I couldn't agree more. I am always triple guessing myself when someone asks me for advice (still trying to get used to that in itself). I can live with the mistakes I make on my own hives but I feel an overwhelming responsibility when it comes to dispensing advice to anyone else.
    Ultimately I have decided that when one of us answers a question, we do so with the best of intentions and I would hope those asking understand that.

    Now if you want the "Bee Whisperer", you must whistle in a long and low manner for up to 10 seconds at a time, and always have your eyes closed, but facing skyward at the time! :mrgreen:
     
  18. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have worked a lot of "other people's bees". with the commercial folks it isn't so hard but does require some time. I kind of get into their head and see how they look at things and ask a lot of questions. when someone is payin' me to attend to their bees I am pretty much focused on doing things their way. for hobby folks and newbees the problem is quite different (mentally for me) in that I can never determine when they have enough information to make an informed decision and often times their purpose for keeping bees is not altogether obvious.
     
  19. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Perry I feel the same way, if I mess up on my own bees things can be changed around quick and easy, but then my bees are in the back yard and nobody is looking over my shoulder either.

    I still learn new things about the bees from others and the bees themselves all the time. I just have to slow down and pay attention.
     
  20. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    "For me it is quite simple to make fairly quick decisions in regards to my own bees but very difficult when it come to someones else's hives."
    I'm with PerryBee and techumseh on this one. Usually when I'm helping a newbee, I give them the alternatives and let them make the decision as to which method to use. In this instance, we decided to take the wait-and-see attitude. I'm not one for buying queens if I can raise my own, but I try not to influence newbees with this outlook. If this doesn't work out, rather than my giving him a frame of eggs, we'll order a new queen. We'll be checking again very soon and make a decision.