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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got some bees from a city neighborhood to help some people out. They were stinging everyone. Very aggressive, suspect they are possible AHBs. The hive is in an old 55 gallon metal drum. They have a lot of honey capped and I don't want to ruin it. The bees need to go. They are way to aggressive to work with. I one idea: set the drum upright and put in dry ice to suffocate them but in researching that not many people have had success. Anyone have any ideas?
 

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Have you found the entrance, and is there only one? How accessible is the barrel, and is the barrel intact as in no leaks? If so you can suffocate they by sealing the entrance the entrance. or using carbon dioxide. Once you've sealed the entrance, drape misquote netting ove
Just a thought.
Barry
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it is open completely on one side with a few small rust holes i can duct tape over. I guess I will give it a shot. The mosquito netting is a good idea to cover the top (open end), thanks.
 

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But before you destroy them, make your determination as to if AHB, it's a established colony, not knowing the location with regards to people and how close they are passer-by's, even a European colony gets surly when constantly agitated by fast moving things close by you may well have a regular colony of bees, but does sound African.
Barry
 

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Light your smoker, drop a couple tablespoons of sulfur powder in it.Smoke thew well. There won't be any live ones left and the honey will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Where do you get the sulfur powder? Because I am uncertain, does it kill them or just make them leave? I am pretty certain they are AHBs. I normally have a few come after me when moving my hives but when I moved these there were a couple hundred on me within seconds. They wouldn't give up and let me out of my suit for about 45 minutes even with smoke. I don't want them to stay alive.
 

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It kills them. Back in the years of bee gums and skeps, the beekeepers would kill all the bees in the fall and buy bees in the spring.
 

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A vacuum with full force kills bees too! I have never had sulfur smoked honey, not sure I want to either.
 

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If you bought bailing twine from a farm store, that's NOT natural fiber, you could smoke them. That would kill them. Anybody have any thoughts on the effect to the honey?
Just my two cents...
 

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If you bought bailing twine from a farm store, that's NOT natural fiber, you could smoke them. That would kill them. Anybody have any thoughts on the effect to the honey?
Just my two cents...
That would affect the taste of the honey.

I agree that if you can get a local inspector to confirm AHB, and Iddee's sulphur was my first thought too.
 

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as far as I know there is no lab closer than the national lab in Maryland to test for africanized bees. we are too impoverished here in Texas to afford this service at our own state lab. this position at the bee lab was terminated last year.

IF the bees have not posed a problem in the past???? I would guess the barrel is getting pretty hot which likely has resulted in melting of wax and honey and thus setting the stage for a massive robbing event. Both the bees in the barrel and any robber will in this situation tend to sting everything that moves.

by adding the sulfur and burning this you are creating hydrogen sulfide which in closed spaces is very lethal. as iddee suggest it will not contaminate the honey. the gas does not hang around very long (it is heavier than air) and as far as I know doesn't have the opportunity to permeate the honey.

I am fairly certain you could not produce enough co2 via dry ice to kill the hive. however co2 in volume is available from welding supply stores and this will knock the bees down but if they are exposed to air quick enough they will revive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Finally got around to it, so here's what we decided to do. Couldn't make up our mind what method to try so my dad came up with a new idea which worked absolutely incredibly ...... a propane torch (aka pear burner). If you QUICKLY swing it across a cluster of bees or even flying bees it immediately melts their wings but the wax does not get hot enough to melt. When they didn't die right away they at least became air born rocks and we killed them crawling around on the ground. Unfortunately they were getting ready to swarm (something about being in a black metal drum in the sun in 100 degree temps) and there was absolutely no honey, but I learned something new.
 

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I picked up a hot swarm this spring, took 14 stings through my jeans before I went home and got my full suit and a mild shopvac I use for a bee vac. Because I didn't want their drones dating my queens, and I didn't want them to take off, I put a queen excluder in the hive, not just a small piece but a full excluder, and they got one frame of comb and 9 empties. They are aggressive enough I haven't done an inspection yet. And after feeding them (I use a feed jar on top of the lid, inset hole has #8 hardware cloth inside, I am not planning on inspecting. Bought a CO2 canister. I THINK I have them on a solid bottom board. I suited grandkids up in beesuits just to help feed the chickens near them today, and told the kids to run when I touched the feed jar to change it and they started coming after me. no children stung, privacy fence around the bee yard and me to chase was good enough, one sting inside bee glove on wrist. I am too tired tonight to set up the canister, tomorrow night will have to do, but I want my equipment back unharmed and the honey, whatever they have, as well. So I have 10 lbs of CO2, and a regulator valve and hose. any suggestions of how long I will need to have that hose inside the front door pumping in co2?
 

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Good news they are not AHB, were having acranky day on Friday as the old queen somehow or another made her departure leaving at least 4 occupied queen cups behind. I bought a CO2 rig Friday, but was too tired to use it last night, and yesterday afternoon it looked like half the hot hive was moving into the nuc next door. I had garden club this morning so I waited, put on my new ventilated suit from beeweavers. fired up the smoker and opened it up. They did not appreciate my intrusion but there were not 35 bees on my faceguard. More like 1. lots of buzzing, but the new leather actual real bee gloves that I bought with the suit did a nice job. Need to know how to get honey off them. 4 queen cups, 1 open, 3 sealed, one I opened didn't have a larva, one did, and probably JUST old enough to be capped,. This wasn't their first hot adventure so I killed every drone I could catch, and all the drone brood, about a full deep frame's worth. On the bright side of the drone larva I checked, which was 2/3 of it, Only ONE varroa mite, out of around 200 larva. Not bad at all, and not even on a sbb. . I ran about 86 cells through with a toothpick instead of damaging the comb they were in, guessing if any varroa in those cells they will die too.
 
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