If time could go back....

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by BjornBee, Nov 9, 2009.

  1. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    We can all learn from mistakes. And even though it's more positive looking forward, sometimes a look back, can be helpful also.

    So what did you do this year that was a disaster? What event or decision do you learn the most from? If you could go back and change it, what would it be?

    :drinks:
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    disaster should be plural given the number of mistakes I can make..

    looking backward the largest mistake I made was inviting someone here in the spring time and having NO CLUE as to how little they knew. so looking backwards if I had to do it again I would still most definitely invite the new beekeeper back but I would work extra hard to make certain I communicated with them a bit better. there is alwasy some 'cost' in things you do not know.
     

  3. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    There are so many. Like trying to teach some one how to keep- bees and they just do not have a clue as it is a statis thing since they have them at the white house.

    Like not checking the bees in the out yard as often because your soul mate who always goes and keeps the records isn't able to go with you. Probably could have saved a couple colonies that bet guess is they went queen less.

    There are more also, like listening to people who claim you can keep bees over winter in Michigan in a 5 frame nuc.
    Do that expermint with just one not 8.

    :( Al
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Never buy out an unknown beek in the fall. No matter the price, it's not worth the headaches you have the following spring.
     
  5. onehorse

    onehorse New Member

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    Never go after an afterswarm right before a thunderstorm! I must have gotten stung 8+ times in a matter of 15 seconds. But, but, but, I didn't know that we were going to get a thunderstorm, 5:30 in the morning, who gets thunderstorms at 5:30 in the morning. Rookie mistake, painfully learned.
     
  6. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Iddee, I would like to hear that story.

    "Never buy out an unknown beek in the fall. No matter the price, it's not worth the headaches you have the following spring."

    I have a story about buying out a bee keeper or was that a haver or what do ya call them kind.

    :( Al
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Without a lot of details, let's just say I lost over 75% of them over the winter and was afraid to re-use the equipment because of fear of AFB.
     
  8. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    I guess it all part of the learning process, and I learned. Those gentle, loving, perfect little girls of spring can become raging dragons of death when there's no flow and it's hot and dry.

    I found out when I decided just to do a quick check after I got home from work...didn't need smoker or anything, my girls are good! Popped the cover and got "popped". :chased:

    Won't do that again!

    Walt
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    After the (90 year old) beekeeper died that sold honey at our farmers market, and i was ask to take over the honey sells (since i'm a beekeeper). I have constantly been expanding my hives to meet the demand for honey and i never have enough. I went from 4 hives to sixty ( and have already lost 5 hives this fall),i'm a 71 year old retired firefighter who likes to keep busy but not this busy. With all it takes to keep the hives alive and the normal beekeeping activities that go with beekeeping the new tracker boat i bought ten years ago has been on the water 22 times. If i could go back i don't think i would have taken over the honey sales and just stuck to truck farming not both, but i love my bees. :confused: Jack
     
  10. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    If I could go back I would have built more equipment, sooner rather than putting it off and losing out on some swarms due to not having anything to put them.
     
  11. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    That is a good indication that you're selling your honey too cheap. Next year, charge $1 more per pound... then see if you have any left over at the end of the year. If not, raise the price again, eventually you'll reach the point where demand begins to slack off a bit and you can cut back the number of hives you tend to and you can enjoy some more free time.