I'm doing a removal, halp!

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by heinleinfan, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    My husband works for the city of Fountain, and they're revamping and old rectory for a new city customer service center. Apparently the project has been delayed over and over but some folks at his work came to David the other day and were like "...want some bees?" because it's delayed again, due to a hive in the walls.

    Apparently there's a "giant" (their words, so no clue how big) hive in the walls. David's going to try to go get a look on Monday to see what we're dealing with but...other than specifics when I have more information...general help would be much appreciated.

    Especially...can we rig up a bee vacuum in time? We're going to have to do this in the next few days, we have a shop vac and can get buckets and such...but I have no idea how to actually rig one up. I'm not expecting miracles, just something to help.

    We don't know if we'll actually be able to save the bees and overwinter them, but the building is being ripped apart, so this hive is going to die, at least we can try!
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I suggest you look up and view several of JP the beeman's videos of his removal techniques. You can learn an enormous amount from seeing how he goes about removing hives from all sorts of walls in a variety of situations.
    As they say, a picture (especially moving picture) is worth a thousand words.
     

  3. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Good Luck.[​IMG]
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would say save all the honey you can. It is likely going to be your only reward. I doubt you will keep the bees alive over the winter unless you can remove the whole section of wall and keep it intact until spring.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Being in Colorado Springs at an elevation over 6000 ft. the temperatures are working against you for saving the bees. Like Iddee said removing the wall section containing the bees as to not disturb the colony to much. If that is not possible if you have a black place in your basement or shed with a red light for feeding them, you could vacuum all the bees put them on drawn comb If you had some frames of honey you could give them it would be a bonus but if kept warm they will take the syrup and store it if kept in a dark environment. just remember that they will produce moisture and will consume oxygen so they can't be in too sealed of space will need some ventilation. There should be little or no brood in the colony now and they should have a good population of winter bees that can survive till spring. In your long term weather forecast Wednesday looks like the best day from 10:00am. to 4:00pm. the temp should be over 60 Deg. for that short time.
    If you have the places to put the bees, warm dark for the next few weeks to feed them up then cool and dark to get thru the winter and place outside in the spring when the weather warms up and spring feed pollen to stimulate brood production. Or suck up the bees and do them in and harvest the honey. In this case just suck them into the shop vac.
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    That is some very good advice right there!

    All I can add is GOOD LUCK!!
     
  7. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    do it for the honey and wax.

    I would almost be inclined to vac the bees (shouldn't be any brood) and dump them over some frames of drawn comb with a super of honey over them if you have it. Put them in a garage or basement with screen over the entrance where you can feed syrup. Take them out on flying days for a cleansing flight. Seems like a lot of work though. Good luck.

    I built a Bushkill bee vac in a few hours out of some scrap lumber on my tablesaw. Not a terribly difficult project.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    hein,
    iddee and apis gave you some great advice, unless you do as apis said.......a lot of work. unfortunate that now they are deciding to find someone to take care of/remove the bees this time of the year.

    best of luck to you and david hein, please keep us posted!