Inner Cover?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by monster maples and honey, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. monster maples and honey

    monster maples and honey New Member

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    I just purchased some hives that were already established, they have the inner cover on them with the center ventilation hole. I am just curious, are the inner covers really needed? Can they be taken out? There are screens below the inner covers, so I am unsure if both of these are needed. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    Monster, you should have a telescoping top over the inner cover. Are you saying that there is a separate screen completely covering the hive that is below the inner cover?...could this be a queen excluder? An inner cover is normally used with a telescoping cover so that the bees can't glue down the telescoping cover. If the telescoping cover gets glued down it is noted that it can be very difficult to remove due to lack of having a place to pry it off with the hive tool.

    Best wishes,
    Ed
     

  3. monster maples and honey

    monster maples and honey New Member

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    The hives came with the screen below the inner cover, the inner cover, and then the top cover on top of that. Someone told me to leave the inner cover off, but I am concerned doing so. I just more or less want to make sure this is going to be ok, or if it should be on the hive. I am thinking it should be on, just want someone elses input.
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Not certian as to your exact location, Polk, could be anywhere, but in the southern and wesstern areas of this country, adequite ventilation becomes critical when temps climb into the mid 90's and higher. Actually ventilation is important period, as it allows the colony to vent hot humid air--a by-product of any living breathing animal/ insect and condensing of nectar into honey. Screen inner covers were considered moving screens so as not to sufficate the bees whle in transit and thier entrance was blocked. inner covers serve to create air space between the outer cover and inner cover and help in ventialtion chores. also the bees will certianly propolize the inner cover to the hive bodies/ supers tops, and prying off a inner cover, while challenaging at times, is alot easier then the near vaccum seal the bees will make around the outer cover. Screened top, the bees will with almost %100 certianity wax and propolize the screen closed and then you can throw it away. so remove the screen before they do wreck it. Inner cover stays, assuming your using telescopic covers they go on lastly. If you find your bees bearding your hive, or loafing, you should consider providing additional space by if you haven't already done so, by adding an additional brood chamber , and or super the colony before they decide to swarm. Welcome to beekeeping
    Barry
     
  5. monster maples and honey

    monster maples and honey New Member

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    Thanks Barry, I am in Ohio and the concern of mine was temperature fluctuations that could harm the health of the bees. I want it to be right and dont want to jeopardize them in any way. I was under the impression the inner cover is always on the hive and you re affirmed that for me. Thanks again
     
  6. Jim 134

    Jim 134 New Member

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    What kind of top outer covers do you have telescoping,migratory or Gable roof :confused:




    BEE HAPPY Jim 134 :)
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The screen is the one to remove, not the inner cover.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I myself have not used and inner cover/outer cover in some 40 years but when I did at some time in the years (summer) we would cover this hole in the inner cover to block this off from the bees building comb above the inner cover. in the fall of the years we would place screen over this same opening to allow moisture to escape in a freezing winter time environment <typically with some porous insulating material added above the inner cover and below the outer cover.
     
  9. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    So, I have inner covers with a notch cut out on one side at one end. When placing the inner cover on, should that notch be facing up or down, I'm assuming down for escape, to the front or back, (back in the winter for vent.?)
    Never really figured that out, this is only my second year.
     
  10. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Notch will typically be UP, as the flat side of the inner cover must be down, this allows bees to come above the inner cover and protect that area from ants etc
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Alright, this is the second time in as many days that I find myself confused! :confused: My mind must be going sooner than I had hoped. :lol:

    Up here (TundraLand) our inner covers come with a 3/8" rim (or thereabouts) on both sides of the inner cover, there is no flat side? On one end I usually remove a 1 1/2" piece of the rim to allow for ventilation/top entrance when required. With the escape hole (porter) in the middle the bees can still access this area to keep it clean of ants. I usually put the notch side down (sometimes adding a 1 1/2" rim to allow for the vent/access opening and simply cover the hole with a piece of chloroplast so the bees don't move up anb build comb up there). This allows for extra dead air space in summer, or insulation and or fondant patties in winter.
    When moving, I simply remove the rim, drop the telescoping cover down onto the inner cover (thereby closing off the entrance) and move 'em.

    I hope I don't bore with these pics but I will repost in case I'm confusing other people (as well as myself)

    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    As with everything bees, different strokes...........:grin: :thumbsup:
     
  12. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    The inner cover serves several purposes. The one most forgotten is it keeps the bees from glueing the telescoping cover down to the top of the hive to the point you will destroy the telescoping cover trying to remove it from the top of the hive.
     
  13. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Perry, not seen those, here every one I have seen has a flat side and a 3/8 on other side with some having the notch cut out on 3/8 side but not all have a notch. , the 3/8 gap goes up.

    The only time I turn mine around, is when putting pollen patties on , then need the extra space above frames.
     
  14. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    The inner cover I has says, "THIS SIDE UP" and the notch goes up.
    (I know the writing is small, but you can see the orientation of the cover)

    671innercover.jpg

    I'm getting the impression from reading this thread that screened inner covers are about worthless. I won one as a doorprize at the local beekkeeper's class, but I haven't used it. maybe it's better if I don't.
     
  15. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Actually Greg, I used a screened inner cover during the flow last season and it helped them process the honey so much quicker. I was adding a new super ever week, and these were with foundation as i had no drawn comb. In fact I looked at a solar fan too, which I have read works very well.

    When the flow stopped the girls tried to propolise the screen closed, but during the flow it worked very well. This year I will monitor closer and remove once the flow stops.

    Mine is a 2" square, with screening at bottom, and then breather holes all around, these are 1" holes also screened, and drilled downwards , so no water can get in ... The outer cover comes down to almost 1/3 of the holes.
     
  16. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Well, since everything I'm doing this year is an experiment, maybe I'll try it, too. :D Thanks for the tip!
     
  17. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    I'll find a pic for you.
     
  18. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I like my inner cover notches underneath like Perry, so the bees can go right into the supers.
     
  19. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I flipped a couple of my covers over several weeks ago and the bees are finally using the top entrance it creates. It's impressive to see a steady stream of bees going in the top and bottom.
     
  20. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Here is a pic
    IMG_6809-1.jpg