inspected the hives in middleburg

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by barry42001, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    we are the hives that were vandalized by being hit with a truck . Hive#1 with new queen eggs and brood on 2.5 frames of 10, bees cleaning 2 more frames of partial comb damaged when run over. Some sealed honey, little pollen.
    Hive#2 3.5 frames of brood, honey and pollen stored on all 3 frames. eggs and small larvae in the partial frame.
    Hive#3 it Nuc that was placed in full size hive, now covering 6.5 frames. these are goldline bees adequate sealed honey and pollen stored.
    I don't have spare brood to strengthen the weak hives. I know what I am going to do, what would you do?
    Barry
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    sounds like your bouncing back slowly good to hear a come back happening
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I don't know how long your season is there. I suppose you could combine #1 and #2 but if they have time I would give them a chance.
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    We have very few day days below 31 degrees and a few more below 40. There are always something on bloom, don't know about nectar flow but pollen always available.
    Barry
     
  5. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I would just keep feeding until they are established. I caught a softball swarm the first week of April and put them in an empty deep with no drawn comb. I didn't expect them to make it, but feeding pulled them through. I stopped feeding a couple of weeks ago after they had 1 and a half deeps filled.
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    believe it or not they aren't taking feed--took a jar of goldenrod honey lol but not sugar syrup so there must be a nectar flow on.
    Barry
     
  7. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    I'd give them a chance to grow their colonies and if by September they were still weak, I'd do combines ("take your losses in the fall").
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Tia's suggestion gets my vote.
     
  9. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Tia,
    Not sure how the nectar flow is in N.C. but down here the dearth of nectar will start in about 2 -3 weeks or less ( maybe all this rain we got will extend the flows a bit I hope.) The sugar syrup they are sulking now I am certain will be gleefully accepted in July. I fully intend to allow them to develop, and because our winters are relatively mild, I will maintain them through the winter and see whats happens when the respective queens kick it up a notch for the spring build-up.
    Efmesch,
    I am nothing if not stubborn, I will do all in my power to nurse these bees along. Was always what was going to happen.
    Barry
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    I am nothing if not stubborn,

    tecumseh:
    I suspect an essential quality for any beekeeper (or at least every good beekeeper I have ever known).

    if I understand you correctly 'your plan' is to let these hive set and when the dearth does arrive then to feed???

    Sounds like this plan is based on the best information available and I suspect your approach should be highlighted for a lot of new beekeeper as a primary lesson.... which really has nothing to do with being stubborn but is that allowing sufficient time and working within the bounds of your season certainly is a well tested approach to many of the problems encountered by bees and beekeepers.