Inspection attire

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Ray, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray Member

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    I haven't done an extensive search, or any search at all for that matter, but I haven't seen a post about how much protection to wear. I have seen a lot of YouTube and a bunch of pics of beeks in their attire. Some wear all, some wear none, what do you wear?
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I let the gals tell me what to wear.

    Most times just a tee shirt. If they start to head but me a lot I will move for the veil and it has to be pretty rough to get the jacket and gloves on. If they are that hot I just put them back together and wait for another day.

    I always tell folks wear what ever makes you comfortable, it is much easier to concentrate on what is going on.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    If I am only looking generally into a single hive or two, I may (weather dependent) wear no protective gear.
    If the weather is not ideal or if I am going to go through several hives, I wear full gear.
    Trying not to wear gloves anymore too! I like the better feel for things.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    shorts work boots veil with a cutoff shirt on most days unless I have a hive I know is hot then its a beesuit
     
  5. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I usually put on a hat, so that they don't get tangled in my hair. That's about it, but I do keep the veil handy. Pretty much like G3farms said, if they're cranky close them up quick and leave it for another day.
     
  6. Apiarist

    Apiarist New Member

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    I've got a jacket/veil that I like most of the time. Also have a simple folding veil that does fine unless the mood is pretty foul. Gloves are too cumbersome and get left at the house. I like what G3 said about wearing what you need to be comfortable. Years ago I purchased two hives with homemade, ill fitting frames and ill tempered bees. I remember the bee inspector taking a stroll through the brush before putting the hive back together.:D Comfortable back then was a full beesuit and a roll of duct tape.
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Ray, my "personal" preference is full gear all the time...but that is what makes me most comfortable.
     
  8. Minz

    Minz Member

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    I always wear my bee jacket and muck boots, everything else kind of changes. Today I had a hive I thought was dead and went to steal the drawn frames and found it alive. I popped open a boomer to get them a frame of brood and wow was that hive big and nasty! Glad I had it on.
     
  9. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    Almost allways wear a veil and have gloves and jacket nearby just incase. Jim
     
  10. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Very seldom wear anything extra,I have a jacket and used it a few times only.

    Working calmly with smoke , moving carefully usually the bees leave me bee.
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    It all depends on what you plan on doing. Most of the time for quick examinations,I just put on my veil-jacket and wear my regular attire underneath. No gloves.
    But when taking off honey---that's a different story. Bees are prone to being "posessive" of their hard earned stores and don't appreciate parting with them. Taking off a whole super above a "one way exit floor" is quiet, but if you have to go inside and select frames from an active super, well, then it's full garb from head to toes (veil, jacket, trousers, boots and gloves).
     
  12. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    This describes my attire pretty closely...jacket and muckers...but I also where long gloves which I added after multiple stings to the hands and wrists last year following a muffed inspection. I would like to go gloveless, but I'm not ready yet.
     
  13. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    I put it all on, not taking changes any more, besides they seem to be camery when I have the suit and gloves on.

    kebee
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    like ef said, depends on what you are doing, like perry said, if i am going through more than one hive, and usually am, i wear protective gear. i always wear a veil, i do not like stings to my face. the other nice thing about protective gear is they are my designated get junk on, and can wear whatever on underneath.....
    as far as gloves, depends on what i am doing. i keep russians, so they can be a bit more persnickety.

    i say wear what you need to wear to be comfortable and work your bees with confidence, then go from there. dave can't really afford to have stings to his hands or face, being a police officer. consider your full time employment.....i worked an investigative field that required a lot of camera work, note taking, typing on the pc, hard to do with hands and wrists swollen from stings, so i wore gloves.
    also, take into consideration the size of your reactions, some of us suffer minimally, some of us more so, i think in general, none of us likes to be stung, so again, wear what you feel comfortable and confident with.
     
  15. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Bee stings have done a great deal to relieve the arthritic pain that I get from working with my hands, so the occasional sting on my hands is a bonus. I should start tucking in my shirt though, last two times I came home with a bee still trying to find a way out.
     
  16. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    I can tell you from experience that its easier to remove equipment when the bees show they are calm than it is to put it on when you discover they are not calm. ;)
     
  17. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    very well put
     
  18. Beeracuda

    Beeracuda New Member

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    The one hive I have right now are really calm. This is what I wore last time, but I didn't even need that much. When i get my new package next week, I will be fully suited up. Once they show that they are this calm, I will back off on the protection.

    DSCF1806.jpg
     
  19. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I always, always wear at least a veil over my head. I've read here and there of a couple cases where people have gotten a stinger right in the eyeball- I'm just not taking any chance of that. I don't own a bee suit, I usually throw a loose cool cotton shirt or two over what I'm wearing, and pull on a loose pair of cotton drawstring pants too- velcro strap around the ankles.
     
  20. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    my rig varies from location to location and is somewhat based on the weather. reading the context of the situation and conveying this to a new beekeeper is very very difficult. most of the time I simply wear long pants and long sleeve shirt and an alexander veil. something I do I cannot wear gloves and something that I do I pretty much know that gloves are essential. once you get to the point where you have a lot of hives and whatever manipulation you are doing will wind 'the girls' up in an extreme manner then you almost by necessity need a commercial suit (I call this full body armor) to get anything done.

    at the extremes and as an example... if you every assist in banging bees out of boxes to make up packages and think that you can do this with long sleeve shirt and long pants and gloves and an alexander veil then after you have pounded the bees out of one or two boxes (and only with 38 more to go) you are quickly going to find yourself looking like a chewed up piece of raw meat.

    ps... I have seen numerous young folks show up for this kind of a drill unprepared (quite typically someone will insist that they borrow a suit but they are almost always wearing inappropriate shoes) and you kind of come to expect that they will not make it beyond one day.