Inspection Left Me Wondering.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Crofter, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I noticed one hive seemed to have a bit less traffic at the door so decided to have a look inside. Have been feeding two to one syrup for a week and a half on that one. Top box had 4 mostly capped frames and centre three had bits of emerging brood still. Mostly wet with thick syrup/honey. The lower box had about three frames about third full of capped brood and quite a few empty cells all polished. I had the hive back together before it dawned on me that I saw no open brood and only possibly a few eggs. Went back into the top where I thought I had seen the eggs but gave up as it is full of bees and I dont like to mess too much with them this time of year.

    I wondered if the queen stopped laying for a few days when it rained and I didnt fill feeders. Also have been getting down very close to freezing at night. They did not act queenless.

    I went into two other hives and pulled a couple of frames with capped brood and same story, the queens do not appear to have been laying for a while. I did not search the whole hives but no open brood apparent. These are not declared Carniolan bees but I think that is their main breeding. Can they be shutting down brooding to be in line with the stores ( hive weights, 2 deeps ~ 120 - 130 lb. Will they take a pause and maybe lay another round. There are empty polished cells in the lower brood.
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I'm not a northerner so I can't speak from experience here. But I would guess that your queens have "closed up shop" for their winter break.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I still have brood rearing going on here Frank. A lot of my hives are light simply because they want to use everything still coming in to crank out brood. Clearly I'll be feeding.
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    How different (if at all) are the climatic conditions in Annapolis Valley N.S. from those in Northern Ontario?
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If Frank has had to put a fire in his wood stove several mornings ago, it must be quite different! :lol:
    Believe it or not, Nova Scotia has the warmest average temperature in all of Canada. I'm betting Frank being in Northern Ontario is in deep "Tundra" land.
     
  6. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It is not a case of taking too much honey off. Even the overwintered hive would have been a way light. I dont see how you could get them through next winter here without having fed. Last year only the one hive that had an early summer mite problem needed feeding. Just too many rainy or cold days; no sun to open the flowers. It seems ridiculous but I have fed around 300 lbs of sugar to 8 hives and they will need a bit more syrup then maybe some dry on the top frames when I wrap! Really, what is the alternative?
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    frank, what ef said about your queens, they have stopped laying and are preparing for the winter months. certain breeds of bees (russians and carni's) stop brood rearing when flows cease and no pollen is coming in, (need both for brood rearing), and two to one syrup for these breeds doesn't stimulate brood rearing in the fall months. they store it. as far as the alternative to feeding? unless you have frames of honey to give them, in either case, they will need the feed to survive winter into spring. wish you well on overwintering your hives.....:grin:
     
  8. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I will be going back into the hives to make darned sure the queens are OK. Would like to see a few eggs being laid just for peace of mind. I think there is a reasonable population of bees and quite a few frames of brood yet to emerge so perhaps I have the young wintering bees taken care of. Spring will be interesting!
     
  9. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Bees are busy preparing for winter. One of the things that goes with this is a almost total shut down of brood rearing. Not sure of up that way down here this time of the year a few keeps I know stimulate brood rearing by feeding to try and get a build up of young bees to overwinter.
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Not only food influences the queens egg laying. The shortening of days, as winter approaches is a strong factor. Up north the change is more rapid than in the south.
     
  11. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, the shortening days are becoming very noticeable; the leaves are turning colors quickly. I went back into the hive I first twigged to no open brood. There definitely is some egg laying going on again in the lower box. Almost all brood has emerged in top box. It appears that the center of the cluster is going to be well over toward the East side of the hive, at least that is where the last emerging brood will be.