Installing Nuc questions from a newbie

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by kemptville, May 15, 2012.

  1. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    I'll be installing two nucs this Saturday. My question is concerning IPM against Varroa which I've chosen to go with the green Drone Pierco frames. Should I be inserting a drone frame when I install the nuc or is there a specific time I need to being doing this i.e. later in the season? And do I place this in position # 1 or # 10 or closer to the brood nest?

    The drone frames are brand new and aren't drawn out.

    My other question is concerning feeding the new hives after installation of nucs - I am told we are in a flow - dandelions, apple blossoms just beginning, lilac, wild strawberry. Should I be feeding the new installs with syrup and pollen subs or leave it to the bees to gather what is currently available to them naturally?

    Thx
     
  2. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    I can't comment on the drone cells, I just install and let them do their thing.

    As far as the feeding, they should have some feed in the nuc when you receive them however it probably would not hurt to feed them 1 to 1 syrup for the first couple of weeks to get them rolling. I stopped using pollen patties here because of the SHB but I don't think they are an issue in your area. PerryBee could probably interject on the flow and pollen substitute.

    Good Luck on your new addition-You will never be the same! :grin:
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    For the price of a couple bucks for a pollen patty (if your local supplier [ lucky you :thumbsup:] sells them individually) and mixing up a gallon of 1 to 1, put them on. The syrup will help them draw out the comb they are going to build, and if they prefer the flow that is going on (as someone else also mentioned, depends on the numbers of foragers you have) they will stop taking it when they don't want it. Good insurance.
    Congrats on Saturday, I know you have been waiting with patience.
    P.S. Don't forget your camera! :wink:
     
  4. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    I've been told to feed any new installation until they have drawn comb out on 8 or 9 of a 10 frame deep. I've actually gone further and kept feeding until they have another deep drawn out as well. Once they have their "house" in order and I place on a honey super, I quit feeding. Good luck.
     
  5. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    The advice to feed and build up your nucs is spot on. Getting a strong colony should be your priority.

    Keep the drone frame in its box for a while. Colonies are more inclined to produce drones early in the season. When you decide to use the drone frame don't place it towards the outside of the brood nest. The bees could refuse to draw/use it. You may need to prime the frame, just before use, with a thin coating of wax or syrup. The bees are most likely to draw the frame when there is a flow on.

    Anyone else got a thought on using these drone frames ? :???:
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Barbarian ask:
    Anyone else got a thought on using these drone frames ?

    tecumseh:
    experience no... thoughts yes.

    sounds like an idea who's time has not come!
     
  7. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    First, I wouldn't use them on a new colony. Let them build up and get established.
    Second, using drone frames requires you to diligently monitor your colonies, so that you remove the capped drone in a very timely manner, otherwise you're just raising varroa. Personally, my schedule is too haphazard and chaotic for me to use drone frames.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Indy said: "Personally, my schedule is too haphazard and chaotic for me to use drone frames".

    PerryBee responds: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: I have the same T-shirt!
     
  9. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    Thanks for all the good advice - I think I'll go ahead and feed both syrup and pollen patties even though its readily available in our area. 3 more days!!! And yes I won't forget to bring the camera :) Thanks All!
     
  10. hankdog1

    hankdog1 New Member

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    Well on the drone question I wouldn't use the drone comb for varroa control. I have heard more experienced beeks talk about this and it seems logical if your killing all the varroa on drones then your selecting for vorroa that will use worker cells instead. Not to mention they are going to feel the drop in population and just like any other living organism they will start to reproduce faster. The best method of vorra control and doing it naturally is to break the brood cycle with splits. Just my thoughts on the subject you can take them for what they are worth. Honestly I don't even have to make splits if I don't want to had bees that haven't been split or seen a treatment since I got them.
     
  11. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    I bought one of these last year as well (also just starting back into it, only now in the age of mites, etc.).

    Drones are raised on the outside edges of the brood pattern, so this is where this frame is to be placed. In a ten frame deep at this time of year, this would likely be one of the last two frames or so to either side of the box depending on how extensive your brood pattern is.

    You won't want to use this in a nuc as you are trying to build on the number of workers in the colony. This won't be used until your bees have drawn out thier second ten frame deep or third medium brood box and are close to needing a honey super.

    All that said, I find that I am 100% in the same boat as Indypartridge and PerryBee and that this frame will likely go unused... ...I am far too scattered in my schedules to think I'd be out there on day 18~20 (no later!), when all of these capped drone cells are ready, but have not started hatching out yet.

    If I do happen to use this frame, the date needed to remove it will have to be marked on every calender in the house (and reminders on my 'puter as well).