Intermediate Exam Question Needs an Answer!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by beeman of glencullen, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. beeman of glencullen

    beeman of glencullen New Member

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    I purchased 5 years of intermediate exam question in preparation fo the exam, and have been busy trying to find answers for them.

    Can anyone help with the following Practical question?

    Assume that you have a vicious colony with an unmarked queen and you wish to requeen it.
    You have a docile nucleas in a distant apiary and the usual beekeeping equipment at your disposal.
    Describe how you would proceed.

    Many Thanks!

    Beeman
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Step 1. Place queen excluders between each of the boxes on mean hive..... Wait 4 days.

    Step 2. Look through the only box that has eggs. Find the queen and remove. If you can't find her, place a queen excluder on top the other boxes, and a box without frames on top the hive. Shake the bees from each frame into the empty box until the queen is shaken onto the excluder. Remove her.

    Step 3. Find the queen from the docile nuc, cage her, and introduce her into the mean hive after 6 to 12 hours of queenlessness. Be sure docile nuc has eggs to produce a new queen.
     

  3. beeman of glencullen

    beeman of glencullen New Member

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    Re: Intermediate Exam Question Needs an Answer! No 2

    Thanks for that!

    Here is another:-

    on opening a strong supered colony in mid-june, you find the clipped queen has been lost, several virgins are just emerging and there is a medium sized swarm on a bush nearby.
    What action would you take?

    Thanks again

    Beeman
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would capture the swarm and install it in a new hive.

    Then, depending on how much expansion I desired, I would make nucs with one or more of the remaining cells and/or virgins, leaving one to perpetuate the original hive.

    PS. Although many beeks do, I DO NOT destroy queen cells.
     
  5. beeman of glencullen

    beeman of glencullen New Member

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    Thanks Iddee!

    Great Stuff!

    One more:-

    On opening a colony in mid-May at the start of a honey flow, you find no eggs, little unsealed brood, and a dozen or so sealed queen cells.
    What action would you take to minimise the loss of honey production?
    What would happen if you did nothing?
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    >>>>I purchased 5 years of intermediate exam question in preparation fo the exam, and have been busy trying to find answers for them.<<<<

    Am I gonna have to do the whole 5 years worth for you? :shock: :confused: :D

    I would search for the queen. They have either swarmed or are just before doing so. If she was found, I would create an artificial swarm. If she has already left with the swarm there's nothing left to do but wait. Again, some beeks would destroy all but 1 or 2 cells, to stop multiple swarms, but I never destroy queen cells. The first one to emerge should destroy the rest.
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    and then it is on to the advanced exam questions :yahoo:
     
  8. beeman of glencullen

    beeman of glencullen New Member

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    Thanks again Iddee! :thumbsup:

    I have only asked the questions that seem impossible to answer. I have Ted Hooper's and Clive de Bruyn's books and about ten more. Unfortunatly they do not enclose a troubleshooting guide!

    :beg: I have 4 more questions to find an answer for and then I will thank you sincerly and wish you many happy days of beekeeping! :wave: :D

    They are:-

    NO 1- imagine you keep seven hives in the same apiary. Describe how you improve the strain of your bees over a period of five years.

    NO 2- describe a method of preparing an obsevation hive for use in a school.

    NO 3- describe a system of management for the production of-
    a-oil seed rape honey
    b-heather honey

    Thanks and Best Regards

    Beeman
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    #1 is too broad.... There would be many ways. Basically, I would raise queens from the best hive and drones in the second best.

    PS. The best two may differ from year to year.

    #2 I can't help you there. I just go into a hive and find the queen and a frame with eggs, larva, and capped brood, with some honey and pollen. Stick it in the OB and head off to school.

    #3 Tecumseh or Sqkcrk, or others may be able to help you here. I don't produce honey. I produce bees.

    Also, I don't think we have heather in the US. I haven't heard of it here, anyway.
     
  10. beeman of glencullen

    beeman of glencullen New Member

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    Thanks for all your help Iddee, I'll wish you many happy hours of beekeeping! :thumbsup:

    Beeman
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    glencullen beeman writes:
    NO 1- imagine you keep seven hives in the same apiary. Describe how you improve the strain of your bees over a period of five years.
    tecumseh: this question can get very complex and would go way beyond any simple one size fit all description. the first
    'problem' would be you need to define is what does improve mean. there is a long held belief/rule amongst queen breeders that you don't get anything without giving something up.

    the simple response is typically you would select from the very best (best in what regards???) of the seven and produce queens from this hive. the problem unstated here is that this simple solution typically means you are inbreeding your stock which will typically show it's ugly head in the form of the alignment of lethal (same kind) sex alleles and quite commonly very uneven tempered bees.

    imho.... at the end of the day culling may be more important than selection. so limiting drone production from undesirable traited hives may accomplish more than selection.<this is likely NOT the answer that the question is looking for.

    NO 2- describe a method of preparing an obsevation hive for use in a school.

    tecumseh: I am not totally certain what method means here???? preparing an observation hive usually means transferring some bees to a observation hive and you may or may not wish to mark the queen depending on the audience (age of students) and teaching objectives (do you want the queen to be obvious or not so much???).

    I really like the 'shoe box' observation hive (the one I have is for medium frames and is therefore very stable) and I typically mark the queen and place her in the space where the bees can be observed.

    NO 3- describe a system of management for the production of-
    a-oil seed rape honey
    b-heather honey

    tecumseh:
    rape seed is about the same as canola here (canola is a Canadian trademark) and is quite often used for creamed honey in Europe. it is used for creamed honey since it granulates easily and therefore need to be removed early (before the first cool weather). the canola honey I have seen here is very clear and for any creamed product you would want to encourage this tendency by using newer wax or unbrooded comb to insure the end product is as light as possible.

    heather honey is not a product produced in the us in any commercial quantity... as far as I know. the honey from heather is a bit like jello and must be stirred prior to being extracted (I think the term is tixotropic sp??? or something like that). there are special devices for doing this which looks a bit like wired bristles which I know of only in the form of pictures. the medicinal honey from New Zealand (maruka... sp???) I think has the same properties and utilizes the same tools in the extraction process.

    hope that helps Beeman....