Is it a mite?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Slowmodem, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I was watching a youtube video about the life cycle of the honeybee. At 7:08, he pulls out a drone pupa out of a capped cell. The picture is below. He didn't mention anything about it, but I saw a spot. Is it a mite?

    I haven't had any drone cells yet because my hive is so young. And I don't really plan on pulling pupae out of cells. But I thought I'd tap the vast knowledge base here and see what y'all thought about it.

    The video is here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSk_ev1eZec

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    hard to tell looks like it very well could be.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think what you were seeing was the space between the body and leg as he was rotating it. go back and watch it again.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    good point G3. You may have solved the mystery. The important part is noticing the dot and asking if it might be a mite. lol
     
  5. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nope. Not a mite. Too small. Not sure what it is, but it isn't a mite.
     
  6. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'll probably see the real thing this year as I go through the hive. But at least I think I have my mind going in the right direction: drone + spot = mite. :)
     
  7. Omie

    Omie New Member

    Messages:
    2,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    When i did it, I couldn't get a pic of the mite actually attached to the drone pupa, the mite came off when I pulled out the pupa, but here is the mite that was on a pupa I pulled out- the mite in question is alone on the paper towel, to the right. You can at least see what it looked like and the size of it compared to the pupa (click it to enlarge the photo):
    [​IMG]
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Good pic Omie! :thumbsup:
     
  9. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    One size comparison I have heard is that a varroa mite on a bee is equal to the size of a dinner plate held up infront of the average human being. Now that's a big tick.
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've heard that one too Mark. Geez, I get squiffy when I have to pull off ordinary wood ticks, or them little black-legged deer ticks that carry lyme disease.
     
  11. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You must have some really good eyes to see the color of a ticks legs. Wanna come down here and do some grafting for me? :)
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    perry writes:
    that carry lyme disease

    tecumseh:
    a subject that most folks that do what many of us do here should pay close attention too... it seems the reports of lyme disease are incorporating a larger geographical area all the time.

    by reports the disease is horrible... remedy early on is fairly insignificant (antibiotic).... if you wait too long for treatment the results are long term.
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    :lol: :lol: :lol:
    Actually, that is the name of them. They are about 1/4 the size of a regular wood tick so they are difficult to see. What gives them away besides their smaller size is a reddish hue on their backs. I hauled off the regular ticks quite frequently when we lived in Lunenburg, (south shore of NS) and a few deer ticks as well. Those you take to Dept. of Natural Resources and they send'em away to be tested for Lyme. If positive you have a nice little antibiotic regimen to look forward to (been there).
    Now that we are in Wolfville (Annapolis Valley) we don't have the problem.

    As far as grafting, only tried it once. Unless I had some sort of magnifying setup, I'm afraid those days are over! :lol: