Is it too late to re-queen?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by rw02kr43, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    And if not, how do I do it? Just find the queen (easier said than done. I've only done it once) then take her out of the hive and the rest make a new one?

    Jason
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would say it is too late to allow a hive to re-queen itself, but it is not too late to re-queen a hive (with a purchased queen).
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    If you suspect that there is a queen why do you want to requeen the hive?
    Is their brood in the hive?
    You want to requeen because of their temperament? If this is the case smoke them well before entering and wait till spring to requeen.
    A little more information would be helpful in determining how you got to this point and the best solutions.
    Thanks
     
  4. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The main reason is so that (should they survive the winter) they will start out in the spring with a fresh queen and maybe will produce better. There is brood in there now. And a ton of honey. These bees are much more aggressive than the bees I had last year. But smoking more does seem to help.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I would not replace a laying queen at this time of year. The risks of something happening is to great and if for any reason the new queen was not excepted the colony would be doomed. Wait till spring when you will have the resources, weather and bees working with you, not against.
    Bees are always more aggressive in the fall when there are large populations of older bees and diminished resources available for forage. In the spring they should be much more manageable while the population is small, making it easier to find the queen and manipulate the hive for it to draw out a new queen.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Post # 5 = Good advice! :thumbsup:
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would wait until spring. Its hard to evaluate an old or new queen this time of year. Requeening will not insure they will get through the winter. If you requeen now and the hive dies out you will be out the hive and the money for a new queen. If there is tons of honey in the hive it sounds like you have a good producing hive now. Another thought bees are more aggressive this time of year. They may settle back down in the spring. Another advantage with requeening in the spring is your getting an even newer model of queen not one that is overwintered that may have more mile on her than you think.
     
  8. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What apis and others have said, best to wait. Also, I've had some queens who produced MUCH better in their 2nd and 3rd years. One of the most overly productive queens I've ever owned was a 4 year queen; I split that hive 2 times and it also swarmed after, and I hated to see her go. So if it is a first year queen and her pattern is good, just maybe not as much as you'd like, give her a few months in the spring and she how she does.

    (Please note, I have a history of being far to overly attached to my queens, for the record.)
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    of course the question is mute unless you can find a replacement queen at this time of year. I am guessing you may still be able to obtain some from Hawaii but as far as I know most of the reputable folks there want to sell in minimum number of 50.

    secondly.... come spring time when lots of folks will have fresh queens the population in the existing hive will have diminished significant and dealing with this problem will be much much easier.