Is there any use for Tansy?

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Hobie, Mar 30, 2010.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I'm considering trying to dig out the tansy on one side of the house. It's pretty and all, but it's in valuable southern-exposure real estate, and I want to put in some blueberry bushes. The Tansy also tends to grow tall, then flop over (on top of my echinacea) and looks messy.

    My question is - does Tansy have any redeeming qualities (medicinal? bug-repelling?) beyond the fact that it has pretty yellow flowers? Is it worth transplanting to a more remote and untended part of the yard? Or just pitch it into the field and see if it survives on it's own? I don't think I've ever seen bees on it.

    This may be a moot question. I may never get all the roots out anyway.

    And to be honest, I can't stand to kill a plant. I'll probably transplant it anyway!
     
  2. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    I'm the same way about killing a plant. But, I have found it easier to rip them out when they are invasive and I know that all I am doing is controlling them.
    It seems Tansy has some medicinal qualities and can be used to deter moths and flies. But, if you were going to use it for those reasons, wouldn't you have done it already? Personally, I think the blueberries would be tastier, healthier and the bees would benefit as well.
    Do you have acidic soil in PA?
    Another caveat is you can be trendy. The up and coming gardening trend seems to be planting edibles in the landscape amongst the ornamental plants.
     

  3. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Edible landscaping! Yes! My in-laws are replacing their flowers with veggies this year. I like the idea... But actually, it's just because I love blueberries.

    Not sure what the soil is. Might have to toss in some pine-needles. (Except I have heard that that doesn't really help...? :confused: ?)

    Maybe I'll pitch the tansy into a crappy-looking corner of the property and let it grow there. The neighboring farm has a junk pile that could use some hiding.
     
  4. M88A1

    M88A1 New Member

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    Tansy has some bad points too. It can kill cattle and other livestock If you google it you can read alot more...I used to get paid 2 bucks a hour to chop it down with a machette ina old neighbors pastures when I was a kid
     
  5. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Dont be quick to try to dig it out; that might create three new heads for each one you chop off! Not sure about tansy but have had a two year battle with japanese knotweed that came home via a potted flower. It root propagates from the smallest morsel. These plants that are considered invasive usually have a specific method to get rid of them. May Google be your friend!
     
  6. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    I just read this information on honey and nectar plants this morning.
    http://www.themelissagarden.com/TMG_Vetaley031608.htm
    Scroll down to Phacelia, Tansy to read about it's potential as a nectar and pollen source. I am afraid it does have a reputation for being invasive though.
     
  7. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Tansy ragward is a nixious weed.In the late 70 it was so bad in Oregon that the state brought in a worm from Newzeeland I think.The worm feeds on the tanzy and has done a pretty good job of controlling the weed.What ever you do don't let it go to seed.