Is this a honey bee?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by dr.buzz, Apr 16, 2013.

  1. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    I saw these working a pear tree in an area miles from the nearest known beekeeper. They look just like a honey bee, but they are small. I've seen online that digger bees/alkali bees also collect pollen and look like honey bees, so I don't know.
    DSC_0184.jpg DSC_0199.jpg
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Leaf-cutter bee? At first glance, I almost guessed yellow jacket....
     

  3. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    doesn't look like a honey bee doc buzz, at first glance, the resemblance of a yellow jacket as dave said, but you are probably correct on a native bee, the digger or alkali, not familiar with either, but did some googling because i was curious.....looks like photographs from google i saw of the digger bee. ?

    i do know that honey bees are really not too fascinated with pear trees unless that is all they have to visit, they do not have the nectar content that they prefer, and if there are blooms underneath the pear trees, or elsewhere, more attractive to the honey bee, they will work these first and then the pear tree. i have read that native bees work these trees long before honey bees do.

    curious as to what you find or think they are!
     
  4. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    I don't know what they are, but they work side-by-side with my honey bees in my pear tree. They are much faster than my honey bees when they fly from bloom to bloom.
     
  5. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    A strain of mason bee is my guess.
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Thinking miner bee usually first solitary bees to emerge and hit the earliest blooms can see the fresh soil piled up around the borrow entrance in the yard.
    Barry
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    the relative size is hard to estimate.
     
  8. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    Yeah......Here is another photo. I was holding the branch closer to my camera with my left hand. So this is my left index finger and thumb in this picture. I just held my hand in the exact same position and measured with a ruler the space between the fold in the skin and the finger joint that you see. The space between the two black dots is one inch (2.54 centimeters.)


    finger-bee.jpg
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Looks like a solitary bee to me. I've had similar ones flitting around my garden's flowers too.
    BTW, glad to see you back posting Dr. Buzz. :grin:
     
  10. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I'm pretty sure this is a species of digger bee. The blond furry legs give it away. Plus, mason and leafcutter bees have a very flat abdomen bottom, where they carry bright yellow or white yellow pollen loads. I think digger bees load pollen on their furry legs, like honeybees.