Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was looking at some pics I took of my second hive and found what looks like varroa to me. Am I right?

[attachment=0:18mfrkbn]v2.jpg[/attachment:18mfrkbn]

click the pic to enlarge.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
Not too clear, but to me it does not appear to be varroa. Rather, it looks like the area where the bees wings are attached.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. I feel better. I know I will have to deal with them eventually, but was hoping it would be next year. (or never)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Just because that wasn't them doesn't mean they aren't there. Someday you might want to do some sort of sampling of bees to see if any show up. Seeing them on bees on comb is often just luck. And doesn't tell you much.

Then again, ignorance is bliss. Bliss is good, sometimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Thanks for that close up photo and then for the info provided by the veterans. This site is a goldmine for us new beekeepers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,708 Posts
Definitely not varroa--they are relatively larger, darker, sort of oval shaped and flat. Usually (but definitely not always) you'll find them on the underside of the bees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
On bees, I usually see them on the thorax. I don't usually see the underside of bees, but efmesch is probably correct. Because, I believe that the underside of the abdomen is where it is easiest for varroa to feed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Do you have one of those boards you can pull out and look for fallen varroa? Our hives are not varroa free, but the bees haven't been so susceptible to them. They are not overrun for which I am glad.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top