Italian experience after neonics ban

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Marbees, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    We have long known that planter dust is a huge problem. However, this does not warrant a ban, only the modifications being undertaken in Canada and the US.
     

  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Part of the problem is not only the pesticide, but its application. We are told that on the 5 scale many of these sprays, etc. only rate a 3, and are not overly detrimental to bees when applied correctly.
    Examples are when spraying is to be done, when bee flight is minimal (early am or just before dusk).
    I can guarantee you that doesn't happen, at least around where I live. At the height of the day when bee flight is at its peak you will see these rigs going up and down the rows with a plume spewing in all directions. So the question then becomes this:
    If the product will not be used as directed, and is hazardous to an industry (beekeepers), should it then be removed?
     
  3. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Wonder what you would suggest replacing it with. going back to the old organophosphates is not my idea of progress. Also need to remember that we [beekeepers] are tiny compared to crop production and we have little clout. You example is demonstrative - rules are not enforced on crop producers.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Absolutely no idea on any replacements, but is status quo acceptable? You are right, we as beekeepers are low on the totem pole. I think (perhaps blindly) that a couple of huge fines is always a deterrent, but if it is not illegal, how do you fine someone? Much like the beekeepers code of ethics we have, if it is not adhered to, the consequences are ?????????
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    As usual nothing will be done until people start dying:shock:. When you can plant a seed like corn for one, that can grow to maturity killing any insect that attacks it, because of the chemicals embedded in the seed? can't be good for human consumption.(IMHO) Some of the sprays they use can be deadly to bees for several days, so spraying early mourning or late evening doesn't really help that much if it's in bloom.:sad: Most everywhere you go people are drinking bottled water because of the chemicals in city water, and the boom of farmers markets the last few years tells me people are leery of what they are buying to feed there families in the super markets. Sadly the only ones who can do something about it only have an interest in getting reelected. Jack
     
  6. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Snip: but is status quo acceptable?
    NO!
    Snip:
    Wonder what you would suggest replacing it with. going back to the old organophosphates is not my idea of progress
    I don't believe anybody wants that.
    ​The complacent " it's better than what it replaced" accomplishes NOTHING.
    ​ Action: Snip:
    Italy has only banned neonicotinoids when they are used for coating maize seeds. It is still permitted to spray the same compounds on leaves. Result: Following the moratorium, there was a clear and dramatic improvement in the number of bees and colonies.