It's 100 degrees out. Anything urgent I should be doing?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Gypsi, Jul 24, 2012.

  1. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have 5 hives going right around here. Good thing I didn't put a remote one up in Rhome, I was out there last week, her drought and grasshoppers are so bad the only fruit or vegetable she has left is her pomegranate tree. And she's in her 70's - feeding bees isn't likely to work out well unless I drove up once a week. Which I can't afford to do.

    So I have 2 full sized deep plus medium, one with 2 mediums, vsh hives that have packed away quite a bit, but part of it has been sugar-water from day 1, so the bees are keeping it, nothing to harvest.

    I have a nuc I started with a vsh queen and 2 frames of brood, one of food about June 8th, they are taking feed, have a robber screen on them, last time I was in was 3 weeks ago, queen was laying eggs in the former feed frame. So I started feeding it then.

    I have a deep plus medium cutout hive from back in March. And a deep plus medium swarm that started out in my garden beetree ornament.

    All entrances are fairly small, 2 inches. 4 out of 5 have full screened bottom boards. The swarm box has a 2 inch diameter hole cut in it that is screened over, so they can eject shb's. (swapped for a solid board when it was loaded with shbs a month ago)

    It is 100 degrees out, I can't afford an ultrabreeze and I am overwhelmed with office work, garden, html, and I need to write 2 books.

    I feed once a week, put a quart of feed on all hives on Sunday July 22nd.
    It's hot. They get irritable. I have a couple of foundationless frames on every box. When do I need to open these for inspections?

    Gypsi
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    sounds like everything is working out fairly well for you.

    if the temperature persisted and went +100 like it did last year I might recommend you reduce all boxes to 9 frames just to give the hive a bit more ventilation up thru the stack.

    this year (so far) however I would suggest to you that you can leave hives alone (actually for quite some time if you wish) until the timing and temperature is a bit better for you personally. since you are taking no surplus the next item you might wish to consider is fall prep <generally for me this mean looking at the vitality of the queens in each box, accessing stores on an individual hive bases, removing any empty space at the bottom of the stack and finally where necessary installing entrance reducers.

    good luck and again sounds like you and the bees are doing well....
     

  3. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Sounds like you're doing the best you can. Make sure they have access to lots of water sources. I use slatted racks and hivetop ventilators as well, but this year my hyper-strong hives are still bearding!
     
  4. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Drink plenty of water and sit in the shade when you get hot. Bees have been surviving hot extremes for thousands of years. We are not using common sense when we try to treat them like humans, mammals, invertebrates. They are insects. Consider how they cool and ventilate a hollow tree with just a 3/8 inch hole. When you attempt what works for people it defeats Bee Sense!
     
  5. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Gypsi...it's dang hot here too. My bees are doing great! We even have a severe drought going on here and everything is brown and crunchy with a near 70% loss of crops. I just keep chicken water feeders full for my ladies.....

    I wear a Kevlar vest in this heat every day and the thought of putting on that bee suit after work immediately dehydrates me and my desire to open those boxes...
     
  6. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    when things got around 100 here I instantly got a huge beard of bees on my hive. I propped a chop stick under the top board and opened up the varoa screen slot on the bottom. It didn't seem to reduce the amount of bearding, but they packed away honey like crazy during that hot spell. funny thing, the first morning it cooled down I went to see the bees and the landing board looked so empty I thought they must have swarmed. Took me a few minutes to clue in.
     
  7. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    WE have been hitting close to 100 here lately. At 90 plus I place a very large piece of cardboard on my hive so that it shades it during throughout the day. It seems to have helped. Some bees still go out and set on the front porch every afternoon but not nearly as much as they had been.

    Do to other reasons I also added another deep body to the hive and that also seemed to help.

    One other thing I have noticed that I attribute to the heat is that the girls are getting testy. I've been stung three times in the last two inspections and that was with wearing my jacket.

    They are still bringing in honey though just not as fast as they where a couple of weeks ago.
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I ventilated the one in the hottest sun about 3 weeks ago, the others are doing some bearding, despite late afternoon shade. Was hoping to suit up this morning and check population, but I have some nice looking clouds out there making thunder-sounds, so I think not. Might take a 1x2 and make some vertical spacers, - hive shape, with holes drilled in and screen over the holes to keep yellow jackets out, but allow a cross breeze to carry off the top heat out of the hive. vent chamber. Put them on when the thunder stops in a morning or 2.
     
  9. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    I'm using my 2011 model Tecumseh organic hive ventilation devices found here on the forum, they still seem to do the job.:grin: ...
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    [h=2]It's 100 degrees out. Anything urgent I should be doing?[/h]Yes--jump into the shower. :rolling:
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    We have even hotter weather coming. I'm needing to do some hive cooling I think. Shade won't work well with my hive top jars. Ventilation or add an extra box? Might have to open hives to decide. It is 9:05 here and already over 90 i think.

    What is a Tecumseh 2011 hive venitilation device?

    Gypsi
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    OK, I read all about the patented stick. And put my bee a/c unit in its own post. I also fed bees on Saturday July 28th, peeking in hives to check for space in the top box. And the first 4 were fine, one needed a super added. Number 5 is alive, and if I hadn't had a suit on I'd have had 35 stings when I peeked under the lid. Banana smell everywhere. This was my old bee tree hive that I moved to a proper box on my trailer at the back of the lot, far from humans. Then bought a queen for but couldn't find their queen so I put an excluder between boxes and gave the new queen her own nuc. Well after their Saturday morning demonstration I determined they needed a new queen. (so does my cutout hive, but not for hotness.)

    I got up this morning, fired up my smoker and carried lids and plywood pieces to cover boxes as I conducted my queen chase. Found her. She had red legs, thought she was a giant carpenter ant or something when she scurried around under/behind the workers.

    Using the queen excluder did a great job of making her findable, no brood, not in top box. Brood, had to be in bottom. And she was.

    Now I have questions (and if no one answers on this thread I will start a new one.)

    I need them to make a queen with new genetics. For today I settled for killing her. She was a good layer, excellent brood pattern, eggs, uncapped brood around day 3, capped brood, plenty of bees. They will start their own queen. I need to remove those cups and take them some fresh eggs with good genetics when?

    And has anyone seen a red-legged queen before? large golden abdomen, but her legs were a dark red/orange (when being constantly bombed by 30,000 bees while working alone, no photos were taken - her body is out on the trailer somewhere.)

    Gypsi - who can't sit in the shade very well.
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If you want new genetics, you don't want a queen made from her eggs. After the bees have made and closed the queen cells from her eggs, destroy them all and introduce a new frame with eggs from a hive whose nature and productivity you like. The new batch of queens they raise will have new genes. Of course, unless you decide to engage in artificial insemination, you still have a chance that your new queen will be mated by a drone from this same hive, and bring along with him genes from his unpleasant mom.
     
  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    How difficult is artificial insemination?
     
  16. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Very difficult, you need specialized tools and the quality of the queens are questionable when used in a regular hives. High supersede rates and premature queen failure. It is used a lot of the time to get a genetic hybrid queen to produce open mated queens from. It has its place in maintaining genetic diversity.
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have no idea but by looking at the instrument (looks a bit frankensteinish) to do this job it does look like lots of detailed work. Collecting the semen doesn't look like an easy task either... and you invariable also collect all this bad karma from killin' all them boy bees.

    typically when you see part of the queen that should be black that are red you think Cordovan genetics. there are some fairly strange genetic combinations in the bee world. at one time I had a picture (I think in the photo section) of zombie eyed drones... their is also a genetically related red eyed drone. and a clue or hint> since drones in a hive are the product of an unfertilized egg the drones are a direct reflection of the queens genetics.... examining some small number of these gives you a lot of information about the queens own genetics.
     
  18. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Thank you. I think that these bees will have to make their own new queen, but they will be doing it from one of my vsh queen's eggs. And hopefully, since I have 4 calm hives, I'll get lucky and one of the good genetic drones will mate with her. Maybe more than one. Wish me luck, it's looking like an adventure in the heat on Friday.
     
  19. klpauba

    klpauba New Member

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    What's "vsh"?

    Thanks!
     
  20. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Varroa Sensitive Hygenic. Not a species, just a behavior pattern that can be bred for. They clean off the varroa. Combined with a sbb, greatly reduces the need for treatment.

    *subject to the limits of my understanding. this is my 2nd year.

    Gypsi