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I've never tried it, but it's a "laboratory procedure". It requires a microscope, special equipment to "sedate" the queen and to get her to open the oviduct (carbon dioxide cylinder and dispenser) and hold it open while semen, extracted from drones, is injected in.
I wouldn't say that it is too difficult but I would say that it requires good steaady hands and a course to show the whole procedure from A-Z. The initial investment is probably quite high but for those who are serious about it, I'm sure it is worth the expense. Try looking in the catalogues of the bigger bee suppliers.
 

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and a snip..
subject to the limits of my understanding

tecumseh...
sounds like you got the basics down pretty well.

I take it gypsi the 'new queen' will be from flyman's bees?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Only if flyman's last name is Atwood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Alright, I'll see if anyone reads this thread in the next 24 to 48 hours.

I went through my closest and largest VSH hive today. Not one frame of eggs in the deep. I did not go through the super, limited time before it got too hot. Saw some almost ready to cap brood, that would be 3 to 5 days, did not see the queen, as I said I didn't go through the super. I have 2 medium supers on here, would not be at all surprised to find her laying in one. And I just let her. She is a great queen.

Bottom box, lots of capped brood, mainly worker, a little drone, lots of almost ready to cap brood, frames backfilled and surrounded with capped honey, lots and lots of bees, nice temperament, much better since I put that 2nd super on. And every box just seemed full of bees. The screened top I added last week was packed solid with bees- not much wind coming through those vents. But then again, I had set the super aside before I opened it, they might have gone up to breathe. Anyway, excellent population, hive looks good, closed them up and fed them.

Hot hive has at least one good sized queen cup going, from their queen's egg. I was going to cut out queen cups, but without a frame of eggs to replace with, any queen is slightly better than no queen.

How would I combine the nuc hive (roughly 5 frames of bees/brood) that I started with the vsh queen I bought in june, with a deep/medium lang of hot bees, to get them a queen and go down to 4 strong hives?

My guess. Cut out queen cells maybe sunday morning. I'm working tomorrow.
Give it a day or 2. Move new queen with her bees into a lang. Put on top of dual box hive of hot bees with newspaper in between? The time lapse should let some of the older workers die off I think.

Gypsi
 

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Hot hive has at least one good sized queen cup going, from their queen's egg. I was going to cut out queen cups, but without a frame of eggs to replace with, any queen is slightly better than no queen.
i
Let me throw in a thought for consideration--How about doing a grafting--remove the larva from the queen cup and replace it with a very young larva from your hive of choice. Since the queen cup is already primed and in use, the success of such a graft is almost 100% guaranteed. You should be able to get a nice queen without losing time relative to the one they have already started to raise. :grin:
 

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I don't know about timing in your area but starting to raise a queen now from 3 day old eggs. By the time the Queen is back in the hive mated and laying it will be the first of September. The bees in the hive will go through a massive die off being that the are summer bees that work them selves to death in as little as 6 weeks. So you may not have the population to support the new queen to build up the population for winter.
To unite remove the old queen and allow to be queenless for a day or two then place sheets of news paper over existing brood and place brood super with new queen on top of news paper, the bees will chew thru the paper and get acquainted slowly to her pheromones and wont rush and ball the queen. If it is real hot (temperature) make sure the top unit above the paper has an entrance or ventilation.
 

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Goes to show you how important it is to know where you come from when asking for advice... Look at the different viewpoints from cold-wintered, temperate BC relative to almost semi-tropical Israel. North Texas Gypsi, it's for you to weigh the considerations and make the decision. :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I've got time. It will be too hot for pond work (above 90 daytime highs) until at LEAST mid-September, possibly mid-October. Fall flow won't really get going til we get some rain, and we won't get that for another 3 weeks if we do what we usually do, could be worse, we could go back into drought. If we do go drought I will be combining to reduce my feeding, but for right now a bit of stability while I observe the weather is fine, and they have all of august to get this queen going. I have to do a lot of my bee-work and bee-learning when it is too hot for my regular business.

Gypsi
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Let me throw in a thought for consideration--How about doing a grafting--remove the larva from the queen cup and replace it with a very young larva from your hive of choice. Since the queen cup is already primed and in use, the success of such a graft is almost 100% guaranteed. You should be able to get a nice queen without losing time relative to the one they have already started to raise. :grin:
I got this message too late, and it sounds a bit too technical for my present level of tools, weather, and knowledge-ability... But thank you! Maybe next summer.
 

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Gypsi says ".....it sounds a bit too technical for my present level of tools, weather, and knowledge-ability... "
Efmesch says: Just as well. Even though it is really amazingly simple (you'll believe me when you eventually do it),
I suppose it's best that you do it after having studied up on the topic enough to feel confident about doing the grafts. I even dare describe the process as "fun" :clap:.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
well.... I think it is too late in the year. My local mentor says it is too late in the year. Newspaper combine?
 

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I have heard reports of hungry bees from other beekeepers. after some absence here for vacation one or two smaller hives have perished due to heat, robbing and starvation. beekeeper in the central Texas should consider some casual program for checking for stores (tipping or hefting is what I normally recommend <the dead one will prove to be quite obvious since they will be feather light). due to the heat I would not recommend any full blown inspection both for the bees and the beekeeper sake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I am feeding regularly, stores are there - I just peek in the lid to check, I set aside the super on the hot hive to check for a queen cell today. (My mentor told me to look). there is a queen cell on the bottom of the frame with eggs that I added, not where I saw the eggs, but on the bottom edge. It was a brief inspection. I took them fresh pollen substitute in a patty with honey (their own) and a jar of sugar water. Mentor says I'll be lucky to get a new queen mated and laying in time, I should either buy a queen or do a combine. My nuc is stuck at 5 frames, was seriously considering the combine. I need to add shb traps to all hives in a day or 2 anyway.

Tec, my mentor is leaving on vacation or already gone... was at meeting last night. I have rain coming in tonight or tomorrow, fall flow should start afterward. The nuc is strong for its size - have drawn out 5 frames nicely, didn't want to risk rolling the queen so no full inspection - but it is too small to fend off robbers without that lovely robber screen, and I had put an upper box on it a week ago, but they aren't drawing it out right now and ants were in it, so I pulled the top nuc box and just put their lid with screen cover spacer back on. I'd like to get them in 10 frame before winter I THINK. I also have a weak 10 frame I could combine the nuc with, and a queen on order for someone! wow. To think I started 2012 with no bees.
 

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sounds like to me that you are progressing in your knowledge and understanding of bee quite nicely. I have made some comments in regards to late summer queen and nucs on your other thread.

and good luck...
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Progressing so much I wish I'd written my notes all in one place instead of scattered around the forum. (but I am grateful I wrote them somewhere). Bee inspector will be here in about 40 minutes. Wish me luck!
 

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Great going, Gypsi. :)

I have a very small (3" x 4") composition notebook I keep next to my computer. Every time I go in any of my hives I write down the date and details for that day. I can't tell you how many times this info has come to my rescue! You think you will remember something....you SWEAR you will remember....and then you forget! Now I can see what I did and when and to which hive, at a glance. Everyone needs to keep a bee log, no matter how simple the log is. The little notebook works well for me. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Omie, You are right, and I need to get a little notebook. My substitute has been posting on forums, and when I'd only been on them a month or 2, that was ok, I could look back and see when I did what. I started my written recordkeeping today on 5 sheets of notebook paper.

On the bright side, only one varroa mite in a sugar roll, none in my drone brood! Woohoo, go VSH!

My bees are healthy, I learned good stuff and I have a real apiary now!
 
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