it's been 3 weeks...

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Buzzen, Jun 14, 2011.

  1. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

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    since I hived my nucs. Should I see capped honey by now?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If they were decent nucs, you should have had capped honey from day 1.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    there seems to be a lot of information (size of nuc, condition of this season) that Buzzen presumes we know????
     
  4. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    You all seem to be cutting the fellow a little short !

    Three weeks, I wouldn't worry about capped honey, eggs, brood and foundation build up, I think are the important thing at this stage.

    At three weeks I'm still feeding syrup, course I'm old and do a lot of " silly stuff "
    { so they say }

    Murrell
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I agree on the brood and buildup, but a quality nuc will contain pupa, larva, eggs, honey and pollen. If not, I'm thinking he may have gotten an inferior nuc and needs to work from that angle. As Tec mentioned, more details would be helpful.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I don't guess your talking about surplus honey are you? jack
     
  7. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

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    Sorry guys, Being a beginner I didn't know what info would help you answer my question!--I got 2, three frame nucs that were hived 5-25. I was really nervous hiving them so I was hurrying to get them in place. I did see capped brood,pollen and lots of bees on the frames but no capped honey. It may have been present. I have been feeding and one hive will use 46 oz in 4 days, the other about half that. Thay are active when the weather cooperates. It was quite windy yesterday 6-14, but I hadn't been in for 10 days so I did a quick inspection. I was worried I might need another brood box. I had new capped brood, Larvae, and lots of nectar but no capped honey. The four outside frames are not drawn or just starting to be drawn. I'm wondering if they are using the nectar before it can be capped since the weather is awful and they can't forage. Maybe I worry too much! I hope this helps, thank you for any opinions and thanks for this forum, its great!-----Todd
     
  8. Scotty Bee

    Scotty Bee New Member

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    Hey Buzzen. I was in about the same place as you a couple months ago, overwhelmed, didn't know what I was looking at, couldn't (still can't) see eggs during inspections, couldn't find the queen, etc., etc. One thing I started on my 1st inspection, is taking HD photos of each frame as I was pulling them. It did 2 things for me. It allowed me to go back and study the photos by enlargening them on the monitor. It also chronicled them to where I could compare the differences from one inspection to the next. It has been a big help in my learning process. It is easier if you have someone to take the the photos while you hold the frames, but most of the time I just hold it at arms length and take the shot myself. I will probably continue to doing this in the future.
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    With a 3 frame nuc, all brood, they are most likely using up the food before having any surplus to cap. As more bees emerge, there will be more foragers and you should see more stores. I think everything will be fine in time.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    thanks for filling us in with a few more details Buzzen.

    Murrell writes:
    At three weeks I'm still feeding syrup, course I'm old and do a lot of " silly stuff "
    { so they say }.

    tecumseh:
    yep what Murrell and Iddee said and I must be old and silly also??? I usually tell folks to at least feed a hive until they are one full box of bees. sounds like Buzzen is about 60% of the way there. of course if the season breaks and you see lots of activity at the front door of the hive and you pretty well know there is a major flow going you can curtail the feeding. depending somewhat on how you are feeding when a nectar flow get to going heavy a hive will quit picking up the feed anyway.

    I also like to encourage folks to worry less and enjoy the bee keeping more.
     
  11. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

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    tecumseh:
    I also like to encourage folks to worry less and enjoy the bee keeping more.

    LOL- point taken. Yea I'm just pretty excited, first bees. I will take pics as stated above when I get a good day for inspection. Hopefully next week. I did see the queen the first inspection on hive 1, so that was pretty cool. I have lots to learn!
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    for bee keeping the learning curve is steep but not unsurmountable. after 50 years I still learn something new from time to time.
     
  13. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Hi Buzzen, keep in mind that if you are feeding sugar syrup to a new hive , much of that 'nectar' you are seeing in the comb will actually be sugar syrup they are storing away to help them grow.
    Beekeepers do not harvest anything that is put in the combs while the hive is being fed...it's not pure honey. So as others have said, just concentrate on getting those population numbers up through feeding and encouraging more brood. A strong hive with tons of bees will be the one to make honey, you wouldn't want to be taking anything anyway from a new nuc that is just getting going.
    This is your learning time- don't worry about capped honey for now- look at photos online, compare them to what you see when you look in your hives- learn to recognize pollen, eggs, larvae, capped worker and drone brood, and adult drones so you will better know what you are seeing when you visit your hives. Take note of where you usually see these things located in the hive too. Observe the area that the brood nest takes up.
    Be very gentle when handling frames, so as to reduce your chance of injuring the queen when you are in the hive. In between inspections, closely observe your bees coming and going to the hive too. Most of all, have fun and enjoy the learning process! :thumbsup: