It's been a very hot relatively hot season so far, so------

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by barry42001, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    living in the southeast, where africianized hybred bees are atleast colse to where I am--would it be reasonable to assume that would be a good season for them, with regards to absconding and populating areas previously not seen in, example is in south georgia, last year africian hybreds were found in 3 counties so far, but no continuiety as to where they came from as not yet in north florida, unless were moved in by loggers which is always a possibility. What I am asking is this--can we expect to see a notiable increrase in africian colonies next year as opposed to what would be thier normal movements in to new areas? :confused:
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Re: It's been a very hot relatively hot season so far, so---

    the following is from experience and testing done here along the line of the african bee invasion in Texas...

    1) the african honey bee suffers in poor years just like bee in a box do. they have no one to add a bit of this or that to insure their survival in the extremely lean years.

    2) migratory bee keepers does provide some buffer against the africanized honey bee.

    3) the more migratory folks feed and rear bees for early spring splitting the more insulation you will have in the early part of the season.

    4) the africanized honey bee appears to do better in the dryer climate of west Texas than the wet landscape of east Texas. in years like this one (worst drought in 50 years) neither the feral european bee nor the africanized honey bee are likely to survive in only isolated location (somewhat associated with water or irrigation).