I've got a tree to trapout.

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Gypsi, Apr 27, 2013.

  1. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    For the moment, it is on the back burner, Pond season is in full high swing, and I'm exhausted. My hives appear to be alive and flying, will inspect tomorrow.

    Iddee, I need to investigate your system thoroughly before I try this. Hogan and I aren't working out.

    Gypsi
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I have a tree limb on an old Catalpa I am going to trap out as soon as the weather warms a bit more. Make sure to take pics!
     

  3. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    The way Iddee explains it is very simple and it works well. You can trap the bees and add them to a hive you already have or you can put a frame of brood "AND" eggs in the trap and let them raise a queen or you can install a caged queen in the trap. Jim
     
  4. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I'm thinking it woudl be a lot easier to just trap the bees in the tree. Trapping the whole tree is gonna take one very big trap.

    What is your problem with the Hogan trap? I am interested because it is the only type of trap I have used so far. So far teh ebs will pass thorugh a super to get to the entrance of their hive. bu once the cone is adde dto prevent passing back into the main hive. they tend to cluster in every nook and cranny they can find to get back in the hive. The bees I used the Hogan trap on actually chewed a completely new exit for themselves. It has taken some work to get them to use the original entrance where the tunnel is again.
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Trap outs aren't that hard, just takes time.
    Be sure to get all of the entrance/exits closed off except for the cone, silicone caulk works the best.
    Be sure to get the entrance of the bait hive as close to the original entrance of the old hive, not the end of the cone.
    Hardware cloth seems to work better than screen wire.
    Be sure to get the bait hive supported properly, would be a real bummer to come back and it splattered on the ground, and the home owner stung up.
    They have to have a queen or a way to rise a queen (eggs, not just brood, and enough bees to cover it so it does not chill or over heat) in the bait hive.
     
  6. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    Just an update on my trap out experience. The final result was I chiseled out 4 or 5 bricks from the wall and dug out an entire colony through a 12 by 8 inch hole. Bee vac was a big assist but killed a lot of bees.

    The trap out did result in me getting two nucs full of bees that where queened from brood out of one of my best hives. The cut out also resulted in two colonies both with fresh virgin queens that emerged during the cut out.

    Having been queenless and the virgin queens appearing mid upheaval has left these colonies very confused. I am not sure most of them will stick with one hive or the other at this point. Bees are out of the house though.