Japanese Beetles

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by brooksbeefarm, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Yep, their back:eek: Been watching for them on the blackberries and grape vines and they didn't let me down. Just over night they moved in and made lace out of some of the grape leaves:roll:. The good thing is my blackberries are through blooming and the berries are still in the green stage, so i could hit them with a spray.:thumbsup: 90% of the beetles were hung up like dogs when i sprayed them, (making more) killing thousands of them. I've not seen any for two days now, but it rained the next day after i sprayed, so i'm watching.Some of my bee club members had trouble with them going into there hives last year? Are any of you having problems with them yet. Jack
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    June Bugs! Dastardly insects! I heard this was supposed to be an off year for them in their cycle but after seeing your thread, I guess they are just as bothersome as always....I always lose my grape leaves and ornamental plum trees in the landscaping...
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Are you sure you're dealing with the Japanesse beetle (whos scientific name I haven't looked up)?
    Fom what I read, they ceased to be a problem years ago when they werepretty well "done in" by a bacterial disease that attacked their grubs in the soil.
    Could it be a different species of beetle?
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    These are Japanese Beetles from what the Extension office says, they look like a miniature Junebug. Hey efmesch, if you know what kind of bacterial disease that is, i'd like to buy a few gal. of it.:thumbsup: Jack
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    i haven't seen them yet but i am sure they will appear. i usually find them on my hibiscus plants on the deck (full sun), and they will totally destroy them. what do you use to spray them with jack?
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I use Asana late in the evening or early mourning (when bees arn't flying) just in case it gets on flowers on the ground that the bees are working. You have to have a license to buy it. Sevin will kill them, but more deadly to bees also. I also found that if you mix Golden Marlan fly spray in milk and set it out, that when the milk sourers it brings them in, i've filled a 5 gal. bucket of dead beetles this way. Caution,the fly spray is also deadly to cats and dogs, so keep it where they can't get it. Jack
     
  7. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    The full scientific name for the bacterial pesticide we call BT is Bacillus thuringesis israeliensis...

    BT is simply live spores of this bacteria. The bacteria produce a very selective protien that kills the larval forms of many types of insects, beetles in particular. The mechanisms of infection are by ingestion. The spores hatch, bacteria multiply and produce ever increasing amounts of the toxin as the population climbs, eventually killing the host organism.

    This is why bees are not directly affected by the application of milky-spore or BT on the ground around hives.

    Given Efmesch's location, I am not at all surprised that Japanese beetles failed to thrive.

    GMO crop seeds have had the gene that encodes this protien poison spliced into their genome. The plants then express this protien in various concentrations throughout their tissues becoming toxic to insects that feed on them. This expresssion includes fluids in the Xylum of the plant (often exuded as honeydew which bees actively collect).

    Bees are not affected by the application of the live bacterial spores (the bacteria do not thrive in the gut of the bees) , however, it has been demonstrated that they are affected by consumption of the free expressed protien.

    Hence the alarm/reservations against these types of seed crops and the possible effects on bees.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "I also found that if you mix Golden Marlan fly spray in milk and set it out, that when the milk sourers it brings them in, i've filled a 5 gal. bucket of dead beetles this way. Caution,the fly spray is also deadly to cats and dogs, so keep it where they can't get it."

    thanks jack, i won't use sevin, what is your recipe, and what type of container do you use for the fly spray and milk? sounds like a 'smelly operation' :grin:
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    riverbee, i buy those square foil pans at the dollar store (about 9 in. square and 1 or 2 in. deep, and pour in milk about half full, then mix two tble. spoons of fly spray in. It's a blue granual looking stuff and takes a while to dissolve (stir it in ). I make a wood box to set the pan in and nail it to the cross members on the fence.(brace between the end post) That keeps it out of the way of pets. Jack
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Nothing like the internet for quick "research":
    The scientific name of the Japanese beetle is: Popillia japonica. Counter to what I had thought, it is still a big pest. But, it does have a disease called "bacterial milky disease" Bacillus popilliae,
    The Ohio State University fact sheet on the topic says: "The bacterial milky diseases, Bacillus popilliae Dutky, has been quite effective at controlling the grubs in certain areas of the eastern United States. The spore count must build up for 2 to 3 years to be very effective and during this time you should not use an insecticide against the grubs that are needed to complete the bacterium cycle. In Ohio and Kentucky, test trials have not produced satisfactory results. Additional experiments are needed to determine the lack of efficacy of milky disease in these soils.

    As small as the difference may seem, this is a species of bacteria different than the well known BT mentioned by Paul and attempting to use BT against the japanese beetle will be ineffective.
     
  11. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    We get them but a bit early, as they seem to be max when the Crepe Myrtles are in bloom.

    I did out milky spore down across my yard 8 years ago and they are not as prolific as when we first got here.
    June bugs are seen in the fields across the road, neighbors chickens love me.
     
  12. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    jack said:
    "i buy those square foil pans at the dollar store (about 9 in. square and 1 or 2 in. deep, and pour in milk about half full, then mix two tble. spoons of fly spray in. It's a blue granual looking stuff and takes a while to dissolve (stir it in ). I make a wood box to set the pan in and nail it to the cross members on the fence.(brace between the end post) That keeps it out of the way of pets."

    thanks jack, i will try this, appreciate it.
     
  13. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    impcat.jpg only insect pest more destructive then Japanese Beetles are in my mind Tomato Hornworm, Manduca quinquemaculata which changes into a beautiful large moth hawks moth like tomatoes, pepers, tobbacco and most everything else. one caterpillar per plant is usually all you will find, but that one will totally strip your plants in a day or two and get huge about 4" long.
    Barry
     
  14. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    The tomato worm turns into what we call a hummingbird moth. They make great catfish bait while still in the worm stage.:grin: Jack