japanese hornets localy downtown asheboro nc

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by beetree, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. beetree

    beetree New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    how do I protect my hives against Japanese hornets?
     
  2. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    umm if its the hornets Im thinking of your screwed, 20 of them can kill a hole hive with few losses, best bet would be a robber screen, if they cant get in your safe.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    badminton racket and lots of patience
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I wonder if a yellow jacket trap would work on them???
     
  5. Adam Foster Collins

    Adam Foster Collins New Member

    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You don't have japanese hornets in the US, do you? Are you thinking of another insect? Japanese hornets are over two inches long, orange and black, and just a few of them will kill your entire colony of bees in a very short time. If you ever do see one, be sure to kill it.

    Adam
     
  6. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Is this what they look like?

    hornet1.jpg hornet2.jpg hornet3.jpg

    I have often heard them referred to as "Japanese" hornets, but I think they are actually European hornets. I have them around my place and they can get pretty large. I've seen some in the 2-inch range. I've seen them look around my hives and then move on. Never seen them cause any problems. I generally give them a wide berth as they generally expect YOU to move out of THEIR way. Never been stung, but I have had them literally run into and push me away.
     
  7. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    they certainly are not japanese hornets , they are european hornets ,and have been in the united states for quite some time with as big as they are japanese hornets are even larger and by and far while they may snag a few honeybees here and there, they are not a threat your colonies.
    Barry
     
  8. ajaz

    ajaz New Member

    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Better to migrate your hives

    Sent from my A52 using Tapatalk 2
     
  9. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ???? migrate your hives ???? why would you do that for european hornets, have you ever moved hives of honey bees yourself that's not a easy process and even if it were japanese hornets to move them only a couple 100 feet would do absolutely nothing , certainly hornets would find it within a day or so but it's already established that not japanese hornets so there is no threat , just take a deep breath and relax .
    Barryhttp://www.beekeepingforums.com/threads/4379-Do-you-all-remember-your-honeybee-predators-just-a-reminder
    you will find pictures of japanese hornets and most other honey bee predators coming to america obviously the japanese hornets not in america yet that we know of .
     
  10. beetree

    beetree New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes. My moth traps catch a lot of yellow jackets and I have some Jap hornets in them also. I'm thinking a screen with approx 1/4' holes to allow drones out but keep out hornets. Possibly use metal sheeting with drill bit holes in it. ??
    thanks for reply
     
  11. beetree

    beetree New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    They are similar looking and definitely in the 2+" range. Wings are much wider completely covering thorax/abdomen extending well behind the critters. Gotta capture one. I believe there are some in my moth traps behind my house in N Asheboro.
    Thanks
     
  12. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Relax guys. While there are near a couple thousand types of bees, to include wasps, in the U.S., without a picture it is hard to know.

    You are probably seeing something called the "cicada killer" which is very active in August. Here is a link: http://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef004.asp

    It is NOT a Japanese hornet that you are seeing. ;)
     
  13. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm in Asheboro, too. I'm pretty sure he is seeing European hornets. Totally (and obviously) different from Cicada.
     
  14. kebee

    kebee Active Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I saw my first European hornet this morning while weed eating by the shop, never notice them before, and they are a big bee, looked to be about 2 inches. Since it was the first one I notice they probly not to many around. I hate the yellow jackets the most, there must be a big nest of them around close some where for I am collecting them by the dozens in my traps and killing quite a few with a fly swater around the hives.

    kebee
     
  15. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, what is known as the Japanese hornet locally here is actually the European hornet. They will pick off a bee now and then, but not enough to damage the overall hive. I just ignore them and let them go.
     
  16. Tia

    Tia New Member

    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What's all the hub bub about? Just put on robber screens. I had baldfaced hornets do in two of my hives in my very early days of beekeeping and robber screens solved the problem. They keep yj's out, too, and around here we're inundated with yj's in the early fall. I keep robber screens on my girls year round. Keeps the girls calm and I can mow right up to the hives and the chickens can run all over the place without my having to worry about anyone getting stung.
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Hi Ajaz. :hi: Welcome to the bee forum.
    You almost got in undetected by replying to such an active thread----But we won't let you by without a proper reception. Glad to have you with us.
     
  18. beetree

    beetree New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Japanese Hornets

    Today I found out I was observing two species of wasp. Not Japanese Hornets. I believe you are correct that Jh are not found in the US yet. The two species were both black and yellow. The larger "Cicada Killer" wasp is 2-2&1/2" long. The smaller Scoliid or Blue Winged wasp is about 2 cm long. Neither is aggressive. I easily captured several with a net and jar. They live off nectar, pollen,(adults) cicadas, June bugs and beetles (larvae) at this time of year.
    Thanks for your interest.
    Beetree
     
  19. beetree

    beetree New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Iddee,
    I caught several today and took them to agext for ID. There were two species. One, the Cicada Killer, is 2&1/2"+ long. Adult feeds on a little nectar while hunting for cicadas which they paralyze by stinging. Then take the body underground about 6" to stash in "chambers" they build. Then she lays one egg in each cicada body which goes thru the usual larval-cocoon-pupa stages to re-emerge in Spring as a mate hunting adult. They are not aggressive. Only females can sting and will only do so if handled. One female I caught was trying to carry a paralyzed cicada 3X's her size. She lit on my bare leg with the cicada in hand. I'm told she was looking for a high perch from which to launch toward her burrow hole with her load.
    The other, slightly smaller wasp was a Scoliid. Also, common this time of year. Both have black and yellow markings.The CK has orange wings. The Scoliid has dark blue wings, aka the blue-winged wasp. Scoliids feed on Green June beetles and Japanese beetle grubs. Adults feed on nectar and perhaps pollen of flowers. Burrowing females sting grubs, using them as food for the eggs they lay on them. They do not sting people unless greatly aggravated or captured in the hands. They fly low over the grub infested ground in a figure 8 pattern.
    I gave a sample of each to the agext agent who has them in a jar now in his office.