Jiggling knife, anybody using it?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Marbees, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Yes I have used them they work great, Perry's uncle Leo had one in his honey house and it got used to the day the steam boiler broke. All that I have seen are heated with really hot water or steam. A friend who still uses his has an 8 quart pressure cooker on an single electric hot plate and has a hose to the knife and the steam vents in the honey house. They are quick for uncapping, but you uncap at the depth flush with the side of the top bar so you end up with a fair amount of honey coming off with the cappings. These knives were mounted over a capping spinner so the honey was spun out of the cappings and in to the sump tank.and the dried. Capping s would be scraped out of the capping spinner the next morning.
    I mite have some picts of one working I will look.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I started using one this year although the tag on mine says Kelleys. The heat on the blade is produced by electric which you control via a rheostat. Compared to an electric uncapping knife it greatly increases output and at the end of the day my right arm is not nearly so weary.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    This would be interesting to see at work. Don't know if my fingers would fair well given my propensity with sharp things though.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    mine appears to operate in a different plain that the one in the picture but I have never had any problem with the device in the form of safety beyond the fact that the blade can get very hot. in operation the Kelley variation on this your finger never really get anywhere near the blade (which in fact is really not that sharp).
     
  6. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Thanks for the responses, some pictures would help understanding how it works.:grin:
    Kelley's was mentioned as the only supplier, but found nothing on their site.
     
  7. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Im kinda looking into something faster for uncapping as well, I am at stage 1, planning the next lvl, Perrys at stage 2, gathering the parts, with just about 500lbs of honey my 1st year so far I know Im going to need a hole new and better setup for next year when Im getting honey from more of my hives at once.
     
  8. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Marbees:
    I have seen that exact same set-up a couple of years ago on a youtube video (shot outdoors). I was really impressed with it as well. This one looks more homemade with guides and such and looks like it shouldn't be difficult to replicate. I wonder how those cutting edges are heated (or if they're heated) It sure seemed to slide through easy.
    If you rig one up, I'll buy the second one off you! :wink: :thumbsup:

    Also, you are about the 3rd or 4th keep I've heard of getting away from the uncapper you are using now. Biggest complaint is the amount of wax removed, and the resulting mess all around the area.
     
  10. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Perry: I wonder how those cutting edges are heated (or if they're heated) It sure seemed to slide through easy.

    Marbees:Small diametar flexy copper pipe (ice maker style) one end connected to the pressure cooker then going underneath of the blade, at the end of the blade connected to the rubber hose, dripping water (cooled steam) in the small bucket.
    On this apparatus I preffer steam to electricity.
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I just watched another video off that link and saw what you described. This seems to work so easy and does not look like a difficult or expensive thing to build, I'm surprised it hasn't caught on here in North America.
     
  12. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Was wondering if a presto pressure canner would work? My only concerns would be that the steam would be vented enough that it didn't blow. I've seen what happens when they blow. Green beans embedded in the walls and oven range hood completely destroyed.
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a marsbee snip...
    Going to sell my Maxant chain uncapper

    tecumseh...
    well sent that bit of 'junk' down here... I will be more than happy to give you scrap price for the thing. < funny face should have been placed here.

    and a crazy8 snip...
    Was wondering if a presto pressure canner would work?

    tecumseh...
    I am guessing some of the old jiggle knives ran off of electricity (mine has a small electrical heating wire underneath the blade) and other worked off of steam or hot water. Kelleys use to also sell (at about the same time I remember them selling the jiggle knife) a stream generator based off a round metal 5 gallon gas can (essentially a couple of caps... one that allowed you to tap into the supply of steam and another that allowed the use of a pop off valve both incorporated into the caps of the gasoline can). Now it looks like some suppliers are using a similar idea with the steam production device looking more like a propane tank... and naturally at a very much more lucrative price. With hot water (vs say steam) you would need a circulation pump to get the knife hot. Ideally if you set this up running off your hot water heater a small circulation pump, a one way value and a bit of tubing is all that should be required to make the beast work.

    if you are considering what you might need to go from being very small in hive number to the place where you need to speed up the production process due to increased number and increased volume of honey the wobble knife is a good thing to get you moving along without emptying your pocket book. the wobble knife and the 6 foot ss drain sink it is attached too and which I bought a couple of years ago is likely the best money I have spent in recent years in revving up my own small honey house.
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hey tecumseh. What do you think of that set-up with the V blade in the video that Marbees posted?
    Also, you mentioned your small honey house, any pictures? :smile: How big a building is it?
    I'm trying to get a sense of how big a building I will need and how to lay it all out on the inside. I have searched for honey house layouts and there really isn't much out there on it.
     
  15. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    In the video that Marbees posted they are using non spacing frames and the bottom board is the same width as the top and side bar. frame spacing and frame width would be critical so the bees will draw the comb out past the top, side, and bottom bar thickness. it is a good idea if your frames are designed for that system. That is why it has not caught on here.
     
  16. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Holy Moley, I watched it and never picked up on that! :thumbsup:
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think that eastern European plow 'thingee' would be slow and a great mess. my honey house is actually two rooms. the extraction room 10' X 12' and the clean up room (basically sinks hot water heater and such) is 6' X 10'. for most folks dealing with the capping is the largest impediment to larger production. currently I run small batches and can fairly well deal with the capping with a punched ss drip pan that set at the upper end of my drip tank and below the wobble knife. I am not much a fan of belts on motors... mine has an eccentric hub on the end of a fairly small electric motor. if my production gets much larger I will quickly need more room to store plastic buckets.
     
  18. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Same here :shock: Thanks ApisBees:thumbsup:.
    Guess I should order an uncapping plane:lol:
     
  19. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I didn't catch it either. Do you think there is a 3/8" spacer between each frame to provide the bee space? Surely they are not all closed together.
     
  20. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    As far as I know, there is no spacer Jim314, they just know how to space them, some use finger, some don't, and it's always right:smile:
    Most of the oldtimers around here use their own frames with flat side bars. 10 frames in brood boxes, 9 in supers.