"Jumbo Eight Frame"

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by rail, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. rail

    rail New Member

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    I have enjoyed my experiment with the Jumbo eight frame brood chamber! Now I'm modifying more chambers and fabricating frames.

    The frames are of Dadant and C.C. Miller design; top bar is 1.125" wide & 7/8" thick, end bars and bottom bar are 1.125" wide and 1/2" thick.

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  2. rail

    rail New Member

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    Cut end bars 1.125" wide & 1/2" thick. Notched with dado blades and sled.

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  3. rail

    rail New Member

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    Assembled frame and pieces. Still have to install dowels in the corners for frame spacing in the brood chamber.

    There are no places for the small hive beetle to hide (holes or excess grooves) in this frame design. The groove in the top bar will receive a comb guide or foundation that will be sealed with wax.

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  4. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    You are a skilled craftsman with a lot of nice toys. The construction would make a custom cabinet maker envious. I have read somewhere that this size box and frames are the most natural to the bees. It's obvious that you are going to use the "crush and strain" method for harvesting. Again, great job, cool tools and I envy you your shop.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Rail nice shop by the way you don use a shoenin the table saw I hope
    I played with jumbo frames in a couple of hives in the 90's I liked them the bees liked them nice having all the brood in one box no rotating supers. I used 10 frame to maximize area for brood. the only thing I didn't like was that if the brood chamber became plugged with honey what do you do with the frames? I would scratch the cap pings dip the frame in a bucket of water to contaminate the honey and place it in an empty super above the inner cover so the bees would remove the honey and store it in the honey supers. It worked but was more of a hastle than exchanging frames from the honey super to the brood super. I only had 2 hives that were in jumbos, maybe if I had made more I would have imbraced them more.
    It is hard finding wood wide enough to get the super width with out joining pieces I salvaged a pile of 1 x 12 shelving from a record store that started in the 50's Freddy's Records the boards were 11 5/8". Your frames look good, are all your frames made that style?
     
  6. tefer2

    tefer2 New Member

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    What kind of homebuilt is that spinner off of ?
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Nice shop Rail. I would add that you certainly have patience as well as a methodical approach. :thumbsup:
    It is folks that "push the envelope" a bit that sometimes come up with great inovations.

    PS Apis, I wonder how many people in Vernon knew that Freddy's Records was actually owned by Fredricka and Dennis Large. "Freddy" was my last step dads (Fred Fuhr, Leo's brother) daughter? :lol:
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Small world Perry. I spent A lot of my part time pay in that store. Still love the 12" vinyl
     
  9. rail

    rail New Member

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    I have mix match of frames now. This style of frame is new to my beekeeping, I hope it will not give the small hive beetle a place to hide.
     
  10. rail

    rail New Member

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    The spinner assembly is from a 1946 Aeronca Chief. It was a trade-in for one that I had spun for a client. That old wooden propeller is a G.B. Lewis, they actually built bee hives during their company history!

    http://www.watertownhistory.org/articles/lewis_gb.htm
     
  11. rail

    rail New Member

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    Lazy Shooter, ApisBees & PerryBee

    I have found that not giving the small hive beetle a place to hide, hive chamber size and colony strength helps the bees battle these pest. Also my hives that had Miller style feeders on top of the chambers controlled the beetles better. So I have modified solid bottom boards as inner covers now.

    Guess I have taken up war with the beetle!:shock:
     
  12. rail

    rail New Member

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    Modified solid bottom board for inner cover. The front is cut off and shallow side is trimmed to 1/4'' depth.

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  13. rail

    rail New Member

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    Beetle trap with standard inner cover, the inner cover sits flat against trap.

    The bottom of the Miller feeder and modified bottom board allows space for bees to chase beetles into the traps. Similar space between chambers or supers!

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