Just brought home a tree hive

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DCoates, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    http://s196.photobucket.com/albums/aa19 ... eHive1.jpg

    I had a lady call me about a hive that was living in a tree that she had just had cut down. I picked it up yesterday. The size of the log was a whole lot larger than I anticipated. I was VERY thankful that she at least had a ladder I could use to slide it up as a ramp. I'll be cutting the top off to level, and adding a little moist pollen substitute and emergency feed sugar and screwing down a plywood cover on top. I didn't see any honey so I am assuming they are low. I did see where a decent size cluster appears to be living but I disturbed them no further. I'd say the population is about the size of a nuc.

    It was above 50 here yesterday and is supposed to get up to 70 today but then head back down in the 40's. I don't have a clue if they'll make it as the drop they made was about 25 feet but the homeowner paid for my gas and time. There was a whole lot of brace comb in and among the rotted wood that seemed to be still intact but who knows if the queen was killed or injured in the fall. I figured this will be an interesting learning experience and I'll cut them out if they make it to spring.

    If anyone has some additional tips of how to handle this, I'm all ears.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Looks like fun time. I would cut the top flat, cover with a piece of plywood with a hole in it a bit smaller than a super. Then I would place a super of frames, preferably drawn, on the plywood. Next, I would feed on top the super, with a hive body and lid protecting the feed jars. To feed, I would use an inner lid with 2 3/4 holes in it and mason jars inverted into the holes. Hopefully, she will start laying in the super and you can then place an excluder under it to keep her up there. Then make a hive out of it and open the log.

    Look at the incoming bees for pollen. Here, they have quit taking the pollen sub and are bringing in pollen full time.
     

  3. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We've got no pollen going yet and I just cut the top off and placed a plywood cover over the hole over lunch before I saw your post. I'll feed them pollen substitute when I get home. We still have plenty of winter left here so I am very reluctant to stretch them too thin by encouraging the queen upward for fear of a nasty cold snap. At this point I want to make sure there's a functioning queen and enough of a population with food to survive the next month or so. I was planning on following your recommendations in a few weeks when stores start flowing and the chance for a deep freeze lessens.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    They have a better chance now than if you hadn't gone out to pick them up. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Good on you.
    Besides, either way you will end up with some firewood :mrgreen:
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yep, that's what I meant. Anything said on a forum has to be adjusted, climate wise.

    Wish you luck with it.