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Do queens lay year round in Florida and places where it never freezes :confused: and if so how long will the queen last before they run out (have to be replaced). Back in the 60's it wasn't uncommon for a queen to go 5 years before they were superseded or replaced. Jack
 

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This seems like a straight forward question, if it's warm, no clustering, forage, etc. But wouldn't the length of daylight play a bigger role in queens shutting down? I assume the days get shorter in Florida like they do everywhere else, but then with the pull those guys in Florida seem to have, nothing would surprise me! :lol:
I have also heard of queens living as long as 5 years but one would have to wonder under what conditions? Nowadays if there was no break in the brood cycle and mites being what they are, 5 years would seem to be a long shot.
 

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as you approach the bottom tip of Florida you are approaching the tropics of cancer... so from that point south there may be a much smaller difference in length of day. also flow and most especially pollen coming in the front door plays a significant role in the queen laying and some breed of bees are extremely sensitive to flow when it come to the queen continuing to lay. I recall Dr Larry Conner talking of one specific line of bees that he produced (way back when) in Florida for Dadant that would cease laying a day or so after a nectar flow had stopped. I think???? this was one of the Cale line of bees. so even something as simple as the queen laying or not has several factor involved.

I can not now even recall working bees at this time of year in Florida.. just too long ago but I don't really think we messed with them much at this time of year. here I can have queens that lay significantly running up to the shortest day of the year but I don't really like them to do so. a hive that brood up excessively during this time of year is a prime target for early spring time nuc production.
 
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