kp index seems to be linked with returning % of workers to the beehive.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping Biology' started by cabeetal, Jul 25, 2015.

  1. cabeetal

    cabeetal New Member

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    many factors disorient the worker bee making her to not be able to return home which leads to population decrease and foraging capacity looses.

    this study caught my attention and i want you to talk things about it. :smile:

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.3896/IBRA.1.53.4.15 a summary -----> Adult honey bees possess a magnetoreception sense similar to other animals such as birds, fish, whales, dolphins, insects, and microbes.Organisms use this sense for orientation purposes during migrations and traveling long distances. The sudden loss and disappearance ofhoney bees from a hive or apiary has been plaguing beekeepers for more than a century. This age-old disorder predates virtually allherbicides and pesticides, many diseases or pests and honey bee management protocols. To investigate possible involvement of amagnetoreception disorder (MRD) with loss of forager homing abilities: A. magnetized wires were glued to their abdomens; B. foragers wereexposed to artificially induced fluctuating magnetic fields; and C. untreated foragers’ return rates were monitored during naturally occurringdisturbances to Earth’s magnetosphere. Treated and untreated foragers were released at varying distances from their hives and their returnrates were monitored. Significant differences in their return rates indicated that interactions existed between forager losses and exposure toboth static and oscillating magnetic fields, as well as during fluctuations in the Earth’s magnetosphere. In addition, D. decreases in untreatedforager return rates also correlated with increasing intensity of extraterrestrial protons that entered Earth’s atmosphere. Finally, winter colonylosses in the northeast USA also correlated with annual geomagnetic storm occurrences. Collectively, these five observations indicate thatcoronal eruptions on the Sun are involved with interference of a forager’s magnetoreception sense here on Earth. How abnormal magneticfields and fluctuations relate to the epidemiology of honey bee losses is consistent with their behaviour and development.

    here you can see the kp index forecast.

    http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/planetary-k-index

    for those that are not familiar with the k index a link to wiki The K-index quantifies disturbances in the horizontal component of earth's magnetic field with an integer in the range 0–9 with 1 being calm and 5 or more indicating a geomagnetic storm. It is derived from the maximum fluctuations of horizontal components observed on a magnetometer during a three-hour interval. The label K comes from the German word Kennziffer[SUP][1][/SUP]meaning “characteristic digitâ€. The K-index was introduced by Julius Bartels in 1938.[SUP][2
    [/SUP]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K-index [SUP]

    and finally a really really cool paper giving proof that apis mellifera has iron traces within her cells.
    [/SUP]
    http://jeb.biologists.org/content/126/1/375.full.pdf+html

    so alls i am doing is looking the forecast scouting for extreme values and knowing what to expect about colony looses and foraging activity
    when the kp index is fairly higher i reduce the bee hives entrance so i reduce the passage flow.

    best ragrds
    cabeetal
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That is interesting, however I still think herbicides and pesticides contribute.
     

  3. cabeetal

    cabeetal New Member

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    yes they are too