Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I checked my hive yesterday and found a small area, about the size of a silver dollar, of larva on a frame in a honey super. There was only this one small area and every frame of the super is packed with capped honey. My hive went queenless about 6 weeks ago but today I noticed a lot of orientation flights in front of the hive so I am assuming that the new queen was made ( found a empty queen cell a week after they went queenless) and is laying. Could it just be that the new queen was checking out the hive and decided to lay in the super? I put a second super on but they haven't drawn any comb in it yet. I am concerned about the new queen ignoring the honey barrier and laying in the new super. What should I do, if anything to avoid this? This is a very strong hive and I am concerned they are out of room in the two deep brood boxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
a snip..
This is a very strong hive and I am concerned they are out of room in the two deep brood boxes.

tecumseh:
well to list your options 1) extract a few frames of capped honey or 2) add a box of comb or foundation.

a note: a hive that goes queenless that has a robust population will pack away more honey/nectar than a queen right hive that is producing lots of brood. rather than the nectar going to brood production it gets stored for later use. it is not so uncommon (with almost any kind of flow taking place) for a queenless hive of this description to have little space left for brood rearing when the new queen finally comes on board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Iddee said:
Probably drone brood. She will lay them anywhere she can find.
Come to think of it, it did look like drone cells. What would I do without you Iddee? :thumbsup:
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top