late season swarm combine

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Vance, Nov 17, 2009.

  1. Vance

    Vance New Member

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    I need some advice please. I have a hive that went queenless about 2 weeks ago. i was going to combine with another hive on the light side. Yesterday i got a call for a new swarm about 6 feet off ground in a tree. I have not seen them yet (going today) lady swears they are honey bees and appeared yesterday around noon. She said they look about the size of a vollyball. This is my first year so was not expecting swarm call in November. Last night temps were in the 30's. My question is, if this is truly a swarm can i combine with the queenless hive, or how should i go about trying to salvage either or both. Thanks for you help. Vance
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Hive the swarm as usual.
    remove lid of queenless hive and cover with a sheet of newspaper.
    Place swarm, without bottom board, on the hive with newspaper.

    FEED!!
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I would also make a couple of slits in the newspaper with a sharp knife to help them get started chewing through the newspaper.
    If you have any drawn comb to put in with the new swarm that will give them a big head start, they have somewhere to start storing what honey they have brought with them and the syrup you are going to feed them.

    let us know how it goes and pics are nice also.

    Good luck

    G3
     
  4. Vance

    Vance New Member

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    Thanks, that's what i'll do, i'll try to take some pictures. Have you ever heard of a swarm this late in the year? I guess the only sure thing with bee's is there is no sure thing. Thanks again, i'll let you know how it goes.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Most swarms this time of year are absconds rather than swarms. A swarm is where part of the bees leave and a new queen emerges to continue the original colony.

    An abscond is where all the bees leave, because of no food or an undesirable home. IE: SHB, their tree fell down, ETC.
     
  6. Vance

    Vance New Member

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    That makes more sense then a true swarm.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    vance writes:
    I have a hive that went queenless about 2 weeks ago.

    tecumseh:
    humm... what makes you certain the hive is queenless?

    at this time of year you need to be careful before declaring a hive queenless. about 80% of the hives I peak into that ain't being fed might appear queenless if you simply looked for brood or eggs. I usually can tell by dispositon.
     
  8. rast

    rast New Member

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    Tec is very right. A queenless hive seems to just get mad at the world.
     
  9. Vance

    Vance New Member

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    The queen was a marked queen from a package installed this spring. I saw her about a month ago. 2 weeks ago i was checking the hive top feeder usually they dont seem to mind, well this day was another story. before i even removed the cover i was being head butted, and it went down hill from there. I left them alone to calm down went back the next day, it was the same. I completly went thru the hive no sign of the queen. Should i wait for a warm day and check again? Also update on the "swarm" it actually was an open air colony. They just noticed them. Very large 12 combs on tree limb. Any advice on how to deal with that.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would leave them until spring. They have been there for months, so a few more won't hurt. If you remove them now, they won't survive the winter on their own. They may where they are. If not, they still got rid of their problem.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    north texas is a big place...

    generally I would agree with iddee that leaving them alone has merit. on the other hand if you are located anywhere in the panhandle area I would think an outside nest has little chance of making the winter.

    first off any outside nest or nest too close to the ground I would check for africanization.
     
  12. Vance

    Vance New Member

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    Tecumseh, you are right north Texas is a big place, i'm located about 60miles north of Dallas. would it be possible to cut the limb and leave everything in tack. move limb and all to my place, try to give them a little shelter and deal with them in the spring, or just leave them alone and see if they make it through the winter?
     
  13. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

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    Where are you, Sherman, TX? I went to college there and the winters could be deceivingly nasty. I didn't have bees then but knowing what I know now I'd at least cut the branch down and put it in a large box (go to an appliance store for a dishwasher or refridgerator box) and get as much food on them as possible. It'll take at least two people to do this and it's not pretty but if one of those ice storms I remember shows up and this hives a gonner
     
  14. Vance

    Vance New Member

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    Sherman Texas is exactly right, DCoates are you and Austin College Alumni? Your right we can get some pretty bad ice storms.
     
  15. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would say wind is more a factor than cold. the next thing I would look at is how much shelter the tree provides. I have witnessed feral nest survive in pine trees in fairly harsh winters around the Bossier City/Shreveport area. Matter of fact the hive made two winters before a logging truck took them out early one spring.

    At some point you are talking about a relocation. The time to do that is temperature critical.
     
  16. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I kind of like the idea of a refrigerator box myself if the nest can be cut down without breaking it apart and some how wired up in the box, closed up and a small entrance hole made for them. It should be pretty heavy and you could even feed them. Sit it on a pallet to keep it off of the ground and cover with plastic to keep it dry. Would be best sitting in an open shed or the barn.

    Let us know what you decide to do with it, will be interesting. Don't forget the pics.

    G3
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    seenin' as how I rear bees here with a state licenses I don't so much think about how to capture or save swarms or ferals so much. sound however like G3 has given it some substantial thought.
     
  18. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    tec do you sell queens and packages??

    Swarms and cut outs are just plain fun to work with in my opinion. I get a real kick out of the beeks who just want the perfect boxes and frames (no insult intended toward anyone, I like nice boxes myself). The bees don't really care what their house on the outside looks like. Comb building and proper bee space all done with a high sense of cleanliness is a good goal for the girls. Not much thought just give them a little shelter from the elements, they worked hard all summer to get to where they are at just could not locate a suitable shelter for themselves back in the spring.

    G3
     
  19. Vance

    Vance New Member

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    Well i moved the hive. was able to cut it down and leave it intact, only had to trim about 4 inches off the bottom of the combs and remove the outermost comb to get into a deep hive body. they had very little honey stored that i could see. put a feeder with 2:1 syrup on them. i put a medium super with some drawn comb on them should i remove it or leave it. My first thought was they would store some, but now after thinking about it i'm not sure if they will. All in all the easiest removal i've ever done. I just hope they make it through the winter.
    I took some pictures but can't figure out how to load them. If someone will tell me i'd be happy to put them on.
     
  20. Vance

    Vance New Member

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