Late Summer Flow??

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by jim314, Aug 19, 2012.

  1. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    The bees are coming and going just like they did during the heaviest flow this Spring. Anyone know what would be producing the nectar they are bring in? We have a large white flower/weed blooming in all the uncut fields right now, but I don't know what it is.

    I stopped and looked to see if there were bees on it but I didn't see any. There is so much of it if they are using it they maybe pretty well spread out.

    Jim
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Up here there is what we call Queen Anne's Lace all over the place but I don't know if bees work it (not that I've noticed).
     

  3. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    It's the same here in Jersey. Queen Anne's lace is done here. The bees are really packing away the nectar and capping honey. There are zuccihni and pumpkin fields all around me that are in bloom but I'm not sure if that is a big source or not.
     
  4. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    Here in CoSprings there's some purple...um...thing...that's a common perennial, it's extremely drought tolerant and the bees *love it*. There's also russian sage everywhere, again with the purple. Edited to add a thought I forgot to finish: I was looking for bee attracting plants during spring and summer at outdoor flower and plant sales, and *anything* that had purple flowers, the bees were just all over, and so I'm working on planting purple everything in the community garden for next year for spring flowers.

    I pulled all my remaining supers today after inspections, I figure at this point any further gathering they do needs to be for the ladies and not for me!

    And Perry - nifty factoid: Carrots (yes, the ones you eat) and Queen Anne's Lace are the same plant, different cultivars. Who knew?!? My husband started a seed library and we've been doing tons of research on seed saving, and Queen Anne's Lace is so prominent in our area as a wildflower, you pretty much can't save carrot seed in our area unless you cage your carrots and self pollinate them, because of the cross pollination. So bizarre!
     
  5. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    Queen Anne's lace is over here also. This is something new.
     
  6. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    There's a pasture just to the northwest of us that is full of Bishop's Weed; it's white and invasive.. I don't think it's of much use to bees though.

    Walt
     
  7. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I think the purple flowered plants you are referring to is vetch, commonly seeded in medial strips between lanes of traffic more recently as a green manure because it is a legume like all clover.
    Barry
     
  8. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I looked up Bishop's weed on google and that is not it either. I'll try to get a pic after work tomorrow. It's 7:30pm here and they are still going strong, on whatever.
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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  10. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    We are in a severe drought, nothing blooming in the fields but Iron weed, ( a tall weed with a dark purple bloom) i have never seen a bee on them? Everything is dried up and brown, lots of ponds have dried up, but myself and other beekeepers i've talked to say there bees are bringing in nectar. All the hives i robbed had 3 to 4 med. frames of fresh nectar in them, it's a mystery to what they are working??? Jack
     
  11. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    We've got goldenrod, hyacinth, pumpkin, and squash flowers, and a myriad of other things in bloom up here. According to those that have paid attention in the past they are ahead of schedule. I don't know since this is my first year, but I'm keeping a log so I can track and compare the flow from year to year.
     
  12. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I have an acre of buckwheat in full bloom, in the morning there are so many bees that you can hear the buzzing from 100' away. The guy just to the north of me has a couple acres of sunflowers too that the bees, but mostly bumblebees, are working pretty hard. The goldenrod also is just starting. My bees are actually drawing comb on bare foundation and packing nectar away right now.

    The interesting thing I noted Saturday morning was the bees were working English Plantain and every bee on those flowers had very full pollen baskets, must be a good pollen source for them this time of year.
     
  13. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I took pictures today during my lunch and also found out what its called. "Snow on the prairie". It is everywhere this year. I also found a couple of references where people say bees visit the plant. One was a honey producer in Austin that list it as one of the wildflowers in his honey.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And lastly the frames of honey I pulled off the only hive I hadn't already harvested this summer. What a difference from one Summer to the next!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. tabby

    tabby New Member

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    Up near Denver there is a lot of alfalfa blooming right now. It's gone wild so is in just about every unused field. That's the only purple plant that I see much of growing wild up here.
     
  15. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Yes, it's kind of crazy. We have fall coming, drought conditions, 90+ temperatures, yet the bees are working like crazy. I tried to count today, near as I can tell I have about 5 bees/second leaving the hive. 300/minute is quite an air show. they drew out and filled a deep super in the last two weeks. Yet 95% of the flowers I see are dried up.
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    yep...snow on the prairie

    fairly typical of not tilled prairie pastures from Crocket westward. probably not much beyond Austin would be my guess. even less in the east Texas piney woods area.
     
  17. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    I had a "mint" bush that the bees just loved this summer. There would be about 50 bees on the plant any time of day. I would love to be able to isolate the bees to only the mint plant and see what the honey would taste like having no other type of plants the bees foraged from. :think:
     
  18. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    You mean you didn't taste the mint honey we had at the booth when I saw you at the State Fair!? It has a surprising taste: not minty, but very rich and robust. Northwest Indiana has a number of mint farms that supply oil to companies such as Wrigley.
     
  19. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    No Way, Mark ! :shock:

    Dang it, dang it, dang it! :frustrated:

    Didn't know you had such a thing over at your booth. :sad: Oh Well...................next year I'll try some for sure.
     
  20. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I've got mint 30 yards from the hives and never noticed a bee on them. I'll have to watch closer now that I've read this.