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Its official I started feeding today. I like to wait until mid March, however, the lack of a winter and temps in the 60's left me with no choice but to start early :thumbsup:
 

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Yep. Same here, Lots pollen coming in and forecast is 50+ for the next week and longer. Looks like we might be about three weeks early this year. Jim
 

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and I am pulling feeder here. my right arm is now 2 inches longer than my left arm from toting a syrup buck for so long.
 

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I put pollen patties on my hives last weekend - but would it be a good idea to put 1;1 on now as well? Like you guys, we have had a mild winter and it looks like spring is coming on pretty quick here in NW Arkansas.

I know that I still have honey in my hives - some probably more than others - but I would like to know just how far does a quart of 1:1 go in a hive? I realize the size of the hive will make a difference, but Do they eat it first before they start storing it or what? I was never really sure about that? For example, I have had hives to drain a quart down in a day's time - do they need another right after that or can I wait a day or two because I can't get out to mine just everyday during the work week.
 

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If they still have sufficient honey reserves, you shouldn't be feeding at all. Feeding this time of year serves two purposes.

First, it feeds a starving hive. ""Good idea""

Second, it boosts brood rearing to prep a hive with an abundance of bees early. ""For bee breeders, that means nucs, AKA money"".

For hobbyist, that means swarms right when the flow begins. ""Not good idea""
 

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iddee writes:
If they still have sufficient honey reserves, you shouldn't be feeding at all. Feeding this time of year serves two purposes.

tecumseh:
sufficient might be hard to define here??? we use to call feeding at this time of year 'stimulative feeding'... the idea was to get the adult population up high enough to add something to the adult worker population of an individual hives. in rearing bees and queens certainly the larger 'growing' population helps (is actually essential) but this same idea would also apply to anyone (hobby or commercial) wishing to enhance their honey crop.

ways and means to limit swarming whether you feed or not is an issue that EVERY bee keeper SHOULD come to recognize and understand. swarming is not totally unrelated to feeding early (and again larger population), but is something that can be managed.

a dead hive never swarms....
 

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Do the pollen patties provide proper "feed" as well as 1:1 or should a person do both? I bought those pollen patties with the Honey B healthy in them - (shipping was ridiculous!) so I thought I would put some 1:1 on them this afternoon just to see what they would take...Or would you recommend me leave it alone for a while?
 

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To tec:
Iddee said:
I think you are saying the same thing I did, but disagreeing with me at the same time. quote]

No! :shock: This just can't be! I would never have believed it! What is this world coming to! :shock:

Boy, if I had a dollar everytime ........... :lol: :rolling: :rotfl:
Good thing these guys actually like one another! :mrgreen:
 

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nope... not disagreeing at all Iddee. elaborating on a simply stated idea or concept is a bit closer to my view of this thread.

for the record... at one time I suspected a lot of new beekeepers had the idea that you should be able to just set a new package into a box of new frames and foundation and everything would work out just fine. from this initial condition (in my own mind) I often suggested to folks that feeding was something positive you SHOULD do to give a very fragile organism a proper start in the world. in this initial mental state I never though that folks could carry this small suggestion to the extreme limits some folks seems to have taken it to.

as I see it Iddee your stated outcome are without a doubt quite possible. within some limits the 'bad' outcomes can be avoided by employing some limits on feeding.... not too hot and not too cold but just right as the baby bear said.

I NOW like to suggest that... 1) if folks would think trickle and not pour in regard to feeding the problem you suggest would be much reduced and 2) some program to qualify and quantify feeding (via direct weighting or hefting or just looking directly) should build experience as to when a hive needs to be fed and when not to be fed.

I do hope my hero Perry is not shocked by this admission.
 

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""I NOW like to suggest that... 1) if folks would think trickle and not pour in regard to feeding the problem you suggest would be much reduced and 2) some program to qualify and quantify feeding (via direct weighting or hefting or just looking directly) should build experience as to when a hive needs to be fed and when not to be fed.""

AMEN!! :goodpost:
 

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This is somewhat related...

In coldish spring temperatures, if (on a warm ~40-50ish day) I put out a jar of syrup in an entrance feeder and the bees ignore it, does it imply that they have sufficient stores? Or could it just mean they are too far up the hive and don't know it's there?
 

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or the syrup was perhaps to cold for them to pick it up (they will 'not do' this same thing in a frame feeder).

for myself an entrance feeder in an empty box right above the brood nest is a excellent way to feed a bit of syrup. an entrance feeder shoved in the front of a hive is one small mishaps from murdering a perfectly good hive. if I was the ruler of the bee world (god forbid!) entrance feeder and those hand hold cut into the sides of boxes are the first and second thing I would outlaw.
 
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