Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay... Regular inspection both hives happy and brood larva and eggs in both hives and functioning queens in both (finally)

Okay... new problem some frames in the bigger colony (we combined to make stronger last week) Now I see webs! SHB or worse??!! I wasn't taking any chances... We pulled all 6 with any web or debris - exchanged with clean partially pulled frames from storage in the house...They are now in the freezer until I get a verdict... Some we were going to change out, any way due to screwy comb, webs7.jpg webs1.jpg webs2.jpg webs3.jpg webs4.jpg webs5.jpg webs6.jpg
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Small Hive beetles do not leave webs, they leave slime.

No need to panic.

It just looks like a few wax moths made their way into your hive during the disruption from combining. Provided the colonies are strong, they shouldn't be a problem long term. Just something to keep an eye on down the road.

EDIT: SHB larvae do not damage wooden frames. Anytime you see tunnels through comb at the mid-line into a wooden frame, it is wax moth larvae...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I removed the suspect frames and put them in the freezer...two are honey frames for harvest. Is this a problem? Then we are going to replace the entire foundation. Is this overreacting?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
I believe the ratio is 8 lbs of honey to produce 1 pound of wax... I wouldn't replace them either!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would not replace them. Freeze for 48 hours and place back in hive after warming to room temp.
Okay I am glad of that. There are two that have messed up patterns like larger drone cells. That part I should't use, or cut out the messed up part?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just didn't know what to do about the worms. Glad for the information here. Thanks1 Just having a rough 2012 spring, but on edge about these ladies. seems we got the sophomore jinxes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Both have brood! and that is a big Yay! and the new queen seems to have a good laying pattern going on too (She has been laying since the 20th...only :grin:.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,048 Posts
I would not replace them. Freeze for 48 hours and place back in hive after warming to room temp.
2nd this. also, you mentioned that moth getting in there in your thread from here:
is this normal
if you have strong hives, they will take care of the moths, your colonies are young. in the future when they are strong enough a moth won't get past the front door....or for that matter anything else. (don't know about shb).

to your question about "There are two that have messed up patterns like larger drone cells. That part I shouldn't use, or cut out the messed up part?"

be a little more specific about your statement or post a pic as to what you are describing as "messed up patterns" like drone cells? drone cells are larger and sometimes drone cells are built wherever the bees decide....it's their nature:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,708 Posts
Beeks like to post pictures of perffect combs--but that doesn't mean that anything less than perfect is no good. When you have the chance to sort things out or organize your hives, keep the perfect combs for the brood box, and move the less than perfect ones up for honey storage. By nature, the bees prefer to build "drone" cells for storage of the honey because they are more economical for them--larger cells use less wax to store the same amount of honey. The girls have it all figured out.
To be doubly secure against wax moths, be sure that there are no spaces where the supers rest one on another. The wax moths are really sneaky and can slip through narrow cracks that the bees don't guard. Also, try to adjust the hive entrance to the needs of the hive during each season. As their population dwindles, they aren't as efficient in guarding too large an opening against those sneaky moths.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes riverbee, I did in fact, see one crawl in there last week, the day they were all clustered because of the 38 degree temps...I don't know the life cycle of the moth well enough to know if I had them before or if this bugger was the culprit. T P1010089.jpg P1010085.jpg P1010087.jpg P1010088.jpg he screwy cells photos...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you, efmesch. I didn't know exactly what to do about these frames. So as long as the queen doesn't lay drones in them, I'm good. Makes sense about the honey...I thought all they would be good for would be candles! The supers seem to fit well, but with the numbers drop over the past month. In retrospect, I see how I should have done much differently and the entrance reducer would have been a smarter thing to do when the numbers are low. I also have closed the top vent as well in the inner cover since I use screen bottoms. I heard the moth buggers go in there too... Do all beekeepers work this vigilantly to keep the girls safe?! Just when one thing is under control...phew!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,048 Posts
hispalette,
the combs are fine, and like efmesch said “the girls have it all figured outâ€. unless you find they are building bridge comb, and you are experiencing trouble removing the frames, then take the frame and slice off the excess, or use 1 less frame, 8 instead of 9 in a super, or 9 instead of 10 in a deep. you are not using traditional foundation and the bees will construct larger cells on foundationless frames, and in foundationless frames placed in supers for honey storage.

also i would not close the top vent in the inner cover!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top