Logging Walnut trees

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by brooksbeefarm, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Going to meet with a Forrestry member of the Mo. conservation dept. this mourning, to look at several big walnut trees on some property i own. He is going to advise me on what i need to do when dealing with loggers. I have heard some bad stories about loggers over the years and wondered if any of you have any advise :confused: . I don't like cutting big healthy trees,but it's time for them to go, if i don't someone else will after i'm gone. :roll: Jack
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    They are black walnut trees, Jack
     

  3. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    You need to make sure that they clean up after themselves, i.e. chip up and/or remove all the brush and small branches left over when they fell the big trees. Some tree companies are good about this, and some not so good. You'd be surprised how much small stuff is left over after the saw logs are gone.

    Are you paying to have these trees felled, and then selling the saw logs on your own, or what kind of deal do you have going on?
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A logger will measure the small diameter of a log and figure the board feet it will produce. Find that calculation and measure them yourself. Then have a price per board foot agreed upon before cutting. Then get paid before the logs leave the property.
     
  5. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Not sure where these trees are, but if they are not readily accessible, make sure you know how they plan to access. The farm next to me had some logging done, and they left muddy, rutted tracks through the woods and (I assume) had to cut additional trees to get through. And they left a lot of brush. It'll decompose, I know, but it is ugly for a while.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I just got back home, the forrester and i walked through the 35 acres of timber and brush. We found over 100 black walnut trees, but most were to small 14 to 16 inches through and smaller.We did find between 25 or 30 that were 18 to 22 inches through, that he said were marketable but would make a valuable veneer logs in another 15 to 20 years (i'm 73 yrs. old) :shock: .These trees he said would bring $150.00 to $200.00 each but left to grow another 20 yrs. would be worth $6,000.00 on todays market.I think i'll leave them for my son, daughter and their families.The rest of the timber is red oak, red cedar scaly (sp) bark hickory, and hedge (osage orange),most all of market size. The forrester said he saw a nice 8 point buck cross the creek while he was waiting for me (10:00am this mourning), i'm plnning on being there in the mourning at 5:00 am. :mrgreen: Jack
    PS. They use a skid loader when logging and do leave a mess, like i said, i hate to cut big trees. It's going to be a great place for about 20 hives :thumbsup: .
     
  7. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    Jack,

    I planted between 600 and 700 black walnut trees and about the same number of pecans on my place 3 years ago. I've had about a 80% survival rate. I planted them for the exact same reason you're leaving these. Best of luck.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    timber folks have more ways to skin you than you have time or the money to discover.

    for one they often employ two different scales which allow them to skin you twice without you ever knowing you billfold has been lifted. then you almost have to post a guard on any possible entry they are using to keep them for employing the old 'one truck load for you and one truck load for me' routine.
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Wayne, we bought this acreage two weeks ago and was surprised to find that the previous owner didn't sell the big timber. :confused: (i'm glad he didn't) We had a CD in the bank drawing point 6 point 2% and the bank loaning it out for 8% plus :eek: , that kind of stuck in my craw. :roll: My wife and i decided to invest it in real estate (there not making anymore land) and if everybody who has extra cash in the bank (not many nowaday) would draw it out and invest it there self,maybe these bankers would find out how hard it is to make a dollar digging in the dirt.At least we can walk on this property and set and watch wildlife if we want, instead of getting a bank statement every month saying we have x amount of money in the bank. :roll: Sorry for the rant,but it was getting under my skin. :mrgreen: Jack
    PS,hope i didn't step on anybodies toes,i'm just an old country boy. :mrgreen:
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    :goodpost: <should be great rant.

    about the most savey economic argument I have heard in recent times. as a person who started off their professional life as a banker I can only say that evidently banking has changed dramatically in my life... so much so that a banker need not make loans any longer to make a profit. why go to all the trouble to make loans when you can get government to give you money for nothing... which then means you need not give someone like jack some reasonable interest on the money they place in the bank?
     
  11. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    That is something I would love to do... but the kicker is that I'd get a stinkin' tax bill every year for that land.

    On a "crotchety" side note, it is not only the loggers who might be greedy and dishonest. A friend of mine has 85 acres in NY that his father or grandfather planted with walnut trees for the future. He walked his property one day and found someone had been coming in to the back edge and cutting and removing the trees. He could not see or hear it from the house.
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie, Hicory, co. is a poor county in Mo. where i bought this 35 acres, the taxes on it are $43.00 a year. There is only one super market in the whole county.( most live on wild turkey and deer) Lucas Oil company may help change that, he built a huge race track for cars and boats in Wheatland, Mo.and the town is showing signs of growth.Wheatland is about 12 miles from the 35 acres i bought. :thumbsup: Jack
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    hobie writes;
    On a "crotchety" side note, it is not only the loggers who might be greedy and dishonest.

    tecumseh:
    when i lived over in el-lay (Louisiana) i had an absentee landowner neighbor that had 80 acres logged in the fashion you describe. I don't think the perps used just a chain saw and pickup truck to remove 80 acres of pine logs... could be wrong, but I suspect some major machinery was required to haul off that much timber. One of the local police informed me they knew who the culprit was but hadn't quite caught the fellow yet.
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Kudos to Jack and Wayne:

    It takes forsight to be able to think beyond your own years.
    A guy up here in Nova Scotia has twice won woodlot owner of the year for his sustainable maple syrup/forestry stewardship. On a fieldtrip with him he flatly stated that his rewards were gotten as a direct result of decisions made by his grandfather, and that the decisions he was making now were not even for his kids benefit, but for their kids!
    That's forward thinking. :thumbsup:
     
  15. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie, i don't think i'll have that problem. This property is on a deadend road, a detective for the sheriff lives at the deadend,(south end) and the county treasure joins us on the north end.Nothing but rough timber on the west (for a mile) and creek bottom land on the east(across the road) that is put in corn or soy beans every year. The owner sowed 10 acres of turnips in the field across from us (not fenced) and another 100 acres of turnips across the creek for cattle? He said if you like turnips help yourself :mrgreen: and i thought my half acre of turnips for the neighbors and us was over kill. :lol: Jack
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Just got through ordering 100 trees and bushes from the Mo. Conservation nursery, to plant in April of 2012 where the walnut trees are. 25 shortleave pine, 25 loblolly pine, 25 serviceberry, and 25 golden currant. I have a problem getting the pine trees up tall enough that the deer don't use them for a rub, found that if you drill a hole in a bar of soap and run a string through it, and hang it on a limb of the pine tree they don't bother them. :thumbsup: Anyone know if the bees work the servicebarry or golden currant bushes when they bloom? Jack
    PS. Makes me feel good that i left behined something for others to use in the future :thumbsup: Jack
     
  17. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Both are listed as bee friendly and nectar producing, so looks good.
     
  18. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Thanks Zulu, i was hoping they were, and they have berries for wildlife and jams and jellies for us. :thumbsup: Jack