looking at the hives

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Zookeep, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    well, did my looky-see in most of my hives and nucs today, 3 nucs are packed and ready to be moved to full 10 frame deeps, the all american hive with the queen I was not sure of has 4 frames of capped brood already(guess she is not a dud lol ) added a deep to the buckfast hive and a deep to the longboat cut out hive, lots of brood popping up now, the 2 hives I have at the small blueberry farm are working the fields hard and doing well, also picked up another open nest removal 10 min from the house almost as big as the last 1 I did (yep Im outa deeps again) and a nuc wont do for this removal, hope every1 had a good day today I know mine was busy :D
     
  2. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    I'm gonna be putting nucs into 10 frames myself, come spring. My question is-how do most folks install them? Do you put the 5 frames from the nuc all together, alternate them with the frames of drawn comb I'll be using, or how?
     

  3. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    put them in the center of the 10 frame deep just as they are in the nuc with the new frames to either side, the bees will know what to do from there and feed 1 to 1 ofcorse :)
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I put 3 in center, then an empty on each side, then a full on each side, then finish with empties. The two outer ones are normally pollen and honey. She may be reluctant to cross them.
     
  5. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I do as iddee does. It helps get them to draw out comb faster. Makes them think they need more room while simulating a flow with feeding
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    the all american hive with the queen I was not sure of has 4 frames of capped brood

    tecumseh:
    making some statement about the quality of a queen during the latter part of the year (November and December) is fraught with potential error. almost always the queens that have no brood at this time of year is really what you want in an apiary. some very limited number of place may encourage brood rearing all year long, but not many.
     
  8. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    hmm , Im trying to remember where but I had read that was not a good idea to move the food away from the brood, now that I think about it so long as Im feeding them it would not matter, thnx guys. As for the brood,the patches may be smaller but down here I dont think they ever stop ,they still bring in a little more food then what they eat, guess its true, theres always something flowering down here, Blueberrys are going into flower for the next month as well as starwberrys and all kinds of other veggies.
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Never move the food away from the brood when they will be in cluster. I don't think that applies to you.
     
  10. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    If it is cold enough for them to be in a cluster and they have stores, you should never open the brood nest. Like iddee said this probably doesn't apply to you. Jack
     
  11. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Ya, its kinda hard to figure things out for a timeline here where I live, and with no beekeepers on the forums other then skyhigh down in my area there is no1 to chat with about it, crackerbee, 2Kool, and ABK live far enough north of me there in a different temp and flowering zone then what I have,heck its going to be 78 today, Tampa seems to be the line, north of it you have almost a actual winter and south of it we have maybe 2 weeks of real cold mixed in about a 2 month period. so all I can do is trial and error, like the feeding 1 to 1, Im already starting to pump the girls up, now they already have small patches of brood capped and larva so it wont take long to be in full swing, but whens the 1st big flow starting? and what is it? everything I read seems to be aimed at more north then south, Im guessing maple trees and do bees hit the pines? we have pines down here that cover your cars yellow with pollen, it gets everywhere. (wanders off with more questions then answers scaratching head mumbling) too early to think about things :lol:
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a lot of bee experiments (historically) have been financed by folks like Dadant and the upper mid west is where many of these old experiments are conducted. suggestion and analysis from these experiments need to be adjusted geographically and seasonally to your own area.