Lost my bees over winter due to cold starvation,what now?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by frecklebee, Apr 2, 2013.

  1. frecklebee

    frecklebee New Member

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    Do I let the new package of bees clean the honey out? Also some of the frames have a large brown area of comb with capped honey around it.
    Thank you for any help
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    clean out the dead bees and hive the new package they will be fine:thumbsup:
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would place any frames with comb and feed at the center of the hive body and set the package and the queen (in her introduction cage) right in the midst of these.
     
  4. frecklebee

    frecklebee New Member

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    Thank you riverrat and tecumseh,I was hoping you wouldn't tell me to harvest all the honey,just tried 1 frame draining over a bowl and made a big mess. Are the dark brown frames anything to be concerned about? Thanks again,i'm off to clean up all the honey drips around the house.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    the brown is the natural color of the boodnest
     
  6. Dancing Queen

    Dancing Queen New Member

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    check again!


    I can spot some contradiction within your post:

    Bees don't usually die of starvation leaving behind honey stores.

    If a colony was still strong in autumn, showing no signs of problems, and then dwindles away to 'nothing' during winter, leaving behind honey stores, it's called Colony Collapse Disorder, CCD, and it's caused by neonicotinoid pesticides.

    Often just the queen is left behind, surrounded by a handfull of attendants.

    Please check out your area for sources of the poison, the contamination probably happened last summer, but the delayed effect of these pesticides makes it hard to detect.
    Maize (corn) is one of the main sources, but other corps like oilseed rape, fruit trees or even treated golf courses can be responsible.

    You might be able so send wax samples to a lab to get confirmation, these chemicals degrade in sunlight so cannot be detected on the bees themselves.

    Please talk to other beekeepers in your area about this problem and if they experience the same then it might not be possible to keep bees alive there anymore.

    The best thing you can do is to help to campaign for a ban of neonicotinoids.

    :sad:
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I do think you are quite right Dancing Bee that NORMALLY bees do not starve with stores still in the hive.... but you will notice I use the word normally and not always. we can all maintain contradiction and at least I have no problem in (often finds it useful) to rethink and reconsider these... it is a healthy and useful mental exercise imho.

    As far as I can tell there is NO direct evidence connecting neonicotinoids directly to colony collapse disease either as a singular or as part of the mix of the 'cause' of CCD. ANYONE who suggest (as you seem to do in the above post) that neonicotinoids is the one and only cause of CCD I would suggest is being a bit naive. However, if you would show me the evidence as to how you came to this singular cause related to the effect tagged as CCD (which no science here can seem to do) then I would be quite willing to reconsider this conclusion?
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "Bees don't usually die of starvation leaving behind honey stores."

    "I do think you are quite right Dancing Bee that NORMALLY bees do not starve with stores still in the hive.... but you will notice I use the word normally and not always."

    barring any other problems or factors, in our midwest winters, yes they do. extremely long cold spells will prohibit cluster movement and bees will starve with honey frames nearby. every year is this normal, no. this year our winter has been extremely cold and long. march and april here have had unprecedented cold temps. i suspect, hope not, with the prior 3 weeks of extended cold weather and subzero temps with no warm spell for the cluster to move, i may find some losses in this category myself.
     
  9. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Isolation Starvation

    In this region of the UK it is quite common to hear keeps telling of loosing over-wintering bees to "isolation starvation".

    It is typically described as a cluster of dead bees on the comb but not in contact with honey stores. Honey stores are still present and adequate. The general view is that the brood cluster did not or could not move to the stores (too cold ??). I have not heard the local occurrence attributed to neo-nics and feel sure the scenario occurred before neo-nics were marketed.

    Local keeps are trying "winter under-supering" to avoid this problem.
     
  10. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Happens all the time in this climate.