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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read the 7 things you need to consider before getting into beekeeping thread. And one of those stated make sure of lot size to have enough flowers to get nectar and pollen from. How do you know if you have enough. I live in a pretty rural area, but there is a significant amount of Corn, Wheat, and Soybeans. And all of those are out for nectar. right? How does one know if they have enough flowers to support the hive(s)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I also just found out about an apple orchard two miles away so that is a definite plus. It just seems a bit bewildering about whether to get into this or not. Thinking well I guess there is enough stuff around here. there is pretty much nothing but farms and what not so I assume it would be ok. thanks for the reply
 

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Bees will work a radius of three to five miles from the hive.

If they find nectar or pollen one mile away they will work that till done.

We all believed they will work our own plants first, but often not true. They work the Best the scouts find.
 

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Lot size? If you have bees, your lot size is approx. 36 square miles in size. The bees don't see property lines. They will go as far as necessary to find supplies. I don't think there's a place any where in Mi. that won't support bees.
 

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Most of my hives are in my back yard in an established neighborhood of lawns, ornamental shrubs, flowers, and trees. The bees go trick or treating year round and my neighbors' gardens do better and their berry bushes are heavy with food for the birds. At a few times of the year, like when ornamental cherry trees are in bloom, I can see and hear large numbers of bees at one source, but usually, they scatter out and find what they need. We are having a warmer than normal fall/winter up to this point, and though there is very little in the way of blooms that I can see, one hive persists in finding and bringing in significant pollen whenever it is warm enough for foragers to fly. I would think that a couple of hives would find enough forage just about anywhere.
 

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A long time beekeeper (gone now) told me, when looking fore a good hive placment area, look for the farms that don't keep there fence rows cleaned out. They will have the best foraging area and the owners will usually welcome your hives. ( for a jug of honey of course) :thumbsup: Jack
PS. Consider the risk of insecticides when putting hives close to orchards.
 

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jimmylang:

Welcome to the forum. It sounds to me like you're doing the same thing I was doing this time last year-overanalyzing everything I could find about the new hobby I wanted to get into-Beekeeping. Then, I met a local beekeeper-an older fella-and he told me something that still sticks in my mind. The bees don't read all that stuff. Just get your equipment and your bees and let them do their thing.

Thats what I did, and am going into my first winter with 3 strong hives. I still read everything I can about bees, and am active here on this forum, but I don't worry too much if my circumstances don't exactly match what I read. There are bee hives in New York City, San Fransisco, Washington DC, even downtown Paris, France. If you live in a rural area, the bees will do well.

I would advise to start with at least 2 hives rather than just 1, that way you can compare them.

Again, welcome to the friendliest bee forum around, and good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks to all those who have replied. I believe i am over analyzing. And yes I was planning on getting two hives. and the more I look around with in a few miles each way there seems to be quite a lot around here. I also was more concerned about enough flowers and such as opposed to lot size. I should have clarified that. thanks again.
 

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soy beans will make honey but is not a reliable honey source from year to year. one year the girls will pack in the nectar the next year the bean may not produce anything. What I do is drive around a mile radius of where I am considering puting hives. Not once but usually off and on through out the year. Then make the decision on wether or not to put hives in that location the next spring. Look at it this way if your local grocery store was a block away how long will it take walking to fill your cupboards. Then imagine the store a mile away. It would take a lot longer to fill the same cupboards. With that said the closer to the groceries the bees are the better chance of getting a good crop. one other important thing welcome to the forum glad to have you
 
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