made nuke this morning. What does this mean?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Sep 20, 2012.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    This is a great forum and I apologize for asking so many questions. But this is a great place to get good answers and timely.

    So here goes.

    I got my free mated queen last night. I made a medium nuke this morning. Screened bottom board. Front feeder and screened the rest of the front openeing. No one can get out and no one can get in. I put 2 full frames of brood in this box with 2 frames of honey/nectar and a couple of pulled frames and a couple of frames with wax foundation. No queen and as many bees as I could get in there from my very strong hives. Then the top cover. We are going to introduce this queen this evening.

    I get home and the air is full of bees in front of the 7 hives. looks like huge orientation flights or swarm . Bees also coming and going like jet fighters in and out of all the hives.

    Then I notice that there is a very large congregation of bees under the landing board of the nuke I put together this morning. All under the landing board and all onver the stand where th bottom baord is sitting.

    Why are they gathering so heavy under this nuke's landing board? any ideas. Nice sunny warm day mid 80's. And there is a flow on.

    It looks like a swarm in the air and maybe gathering under this nuke. I am 99.5% sure I didnt move a queen. I took 1 frame of brood from 2 different hives and I saw the queen in one of the hives so I know I didn't move her. The second frame I looked and looked the frame over very carefully.

    I have not seen any warm cells in any of my hives and I have room in all of them.
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    believe you answered the question. mid 80's nuc full of bees equals bearding. They will go in when it cools off
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    but they cant get out of the nuke. I have them screened in. Thats whats stumping me.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Front feeder + September = robbing, 99% of the time.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    They cant get in. I have sceened the entrance to the hive because I was woried about robbing.

    I could see them gathering trying to get in. Maybe thats all it was.
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    by chance when you made up the nuc did you put it in place of an existing hive. Iddee may be right on the robbing that was my first thought.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They can't get in, but they can smell the food. Go out tonight and see if they are still there. If so, open the entrance and let them in.

    If they are gone, robbing......
     
  8. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I too suspect the frenzy is due to all the nearby hives wanting to get a crack at those frames of honey- they can smell it. Meanwhile, the bees in the nuc are all mixed up from various other hives, they have no familiar queen, and probably won't be into defending a hive they themselves are strangers in. As soon as you open the entrance...neighborhood dinner bell is ringing. =8-*
    Not sure how you would solve this current situation. I think it's why most people don't make nucs in the Fall.
     
  9. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    This happened to me this past weekend when I took supers full of nectar/honey off my strong hives and distributed them to all my nucs. It was complete chaos until evening then all was good. The next day it was foraging as usual.
     
  10. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Was the syrup leaking out of the boardman feeder and dripping from it's entrance(inside the nuc) through the screened bottomboard? I've had that happen. Jack
     
  11. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yankee, don't apologize for your questions....then we won't answer if you keep doing that......:lol:

    iddee:
    "Front feeder + September = robbing, 99% of the time." and "They can't get in, but they can smell the food. Go out tonight and see if they are still there. If so, open the entrance and let them in. If they are gone, robbing......"

    omie:
    ".neighborhood dinner bell is ringing"

    (especially on a small hive or nuc this time of year)

    jack:
    "Was the syrup leaking out of the boardman feeder and dripping"

    i am with all the above replies yankee regarding robbing, very smart thinking to screen them in, but like omie pointed out, if it is robbing, when the screen comes off ???? some extra thoughts, if you can get rid of the boardman feeder on it....if this is robbing, the bees won't stop until it's robbed out when that screen comes off, i would consider moving her if you can and reducing the entrance to the traffic in front to give them a chance to defend themselves.
     
  12. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    OK, what an evening in the bee yard.

    Got back down there to introduce the queen. Everything looked normal. There was a very small group of bees (golfball size)balled up at the screened entrance but that was it. I opened the top and sat the queen on the top bars(in her cage) and the bees came a runnin. They covered both sides of the queen frame cage. I dont know if they were being agressive or happy. (not experienced enough to know yet) but it was cool to see none the less. I put the cage frame in between 2 frames of brood. They were standing on top fanning. So I left the top off as there were several bees flying and landing in the hive.

    I guess I will release her on Sunday? Is that about right? Should I look for anything special before releasing her that will tell me things are ok?

    Guess what, while I was watching this nuke my buddy was looking through this hive that we think (thought)is queenless (reason for getting this quenn and starting this nuke) and he says "we have a queen my friend" sure enough he was looking at a young queen. Don't know if shes mated yet- no eggs but she is surly in there.

    So, now we have to try and get both hives ready for winter. We have 3 very strong hives with loads of bees and brood. I think we can get these two hives beefed up before winter with some brood from these big hives. I will check the virgin queen in a few weeks and see if she is laying.

    The beek I got the laying queen from last night said she is laying 1 side of a deep per day.

    Oh, how long should I keep the screen on the front entrance of this nuke, I am thinking for a few days after I release the queen. They have feed and vetilation inside the hive. Some honey and sugar water. I may move it to a top feeder instead of the front feeder.

    All in all a very rewarding day in the bee yard. May have 7 hives now.
     
  13. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    If I need to move this nuke away from the bee until winter, how far would I have to move it, a couple acres away or miles away.

    or will a entrance reducer be suffecient once they get established.
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I would (and did) go with a robber screen on my nuc today. Mine has probably less brood than yours, does have a mated queen, and the bees in it are all her offspring, as is the frame of brood I added this evening from her old hive. But at this time of year, a robber screen is worth building. Iddee has some simple plans. I have complicated plans somewhere. But I also had my nuc robber screen already...
     
  15. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    first off it is nuc and not nuke... what'do'ya want homeland security looking over our sholders???

    and a snip...
    There was a very small group of bees (golfball size)balled up at the screened entrance but that was it.

    tecumseh:
    most times when I see what I think you are describing I think there is a virgin or new mated queen in the center of the mass of bees. I kind of had the same impression when you wrote..

    snip...
    Then I notice that there is a very large congregation of bees under the landing board of the nuke

    and another snip...
    The beek I got the laying queen from last night said she is laying 1 side of a deep per day.

    tecumseh...
    let me just say I would be a bit doubtful about this observation. you could 'do the math' and I suspect you would be doubtful also.
     
  16. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    HeHe. "made a nuke this morning" I wondered why those black helicopters were flying over my house yesterday.
     
  17. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :shock: :lol: :rolling:
     
  18. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I hope you closed up the hive before you left...?

    Bees fanning near the new queen's cage would normally indicate they were happy and excited upon her arrival.

    Is there a real reason you are needing to be moving your hives around at this point in the season? Moving the hives around wouldn't really 'help' them if they are just now trying to get established. Lots of stuff we do that isn't a problem at all in the Spring can disrupt and set the bees back in the Fall.

    I would strongly advise against an entrance feeder on a new small hive in the Fall. If you feed now, keep the food inside the hive and reduce the entrances to no more than 1" so they can defend against a frenzy of robbers.
     
  19. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Thanks Omie. I wont move them and will change from entrance feeder to top feeder. I still have the screen over the entrance for now. No one coming or going. How do know when to release the queen? And how long should I keep the screen over the entrance.And yes, I closed up the hive.
     
  20. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Did you position the queen cage so that the workers have access to a screened side of it, so that they can feed the queen through the screen? You don't want to cut the queen off from food and air by sealing the screened sides of her cage up.

    I would think it would be safe to release her in 3 full days, but other folks would know more than I.

    Make sure when you do open the screen entrance, that you only allow about 1", or even just a HALF inch, for bees to come and go in any entrance.
    Others will know more than I here, but if it were me I'd remove the screen tonight. You can use steel wool to stuff the entrance on one side to reduce it real small for a few days if you like.