Making Creamed Honey?

Discussion in 'Products of the Hive' started by brooksbeefarm, Oct 8, 2012.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Anyone have a recipe for making creamed honey? How to add and how much extract flavoring to add?(if wanted) I was told the creamed honey you buy at the super market can be used for a starter to mix one part starter to nine part honey. I don't want to heat the honey to make it if i don/t have to. I told customers at the farmers market that keep asking for it, that i would try to make some for next year.:roll: Hope i'm not getting into something i'll be sorry for. Jack
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    As far as I know Jack you have the right idea. I don't know why you would need to heat anything though. Just blend in your seed and then let it set. If my memory serves me isn't it around 57 degrees for the quickest granulation?
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Yes Perry,57 degrees is what i've got wrote down. I bought some Watkins extract (Almond, raspberry, vanilla nut) for flavoring, i guess by tast? didn't know if there is something better to use? thought i would ask. Jack
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I wish I could help you Jack. It might be a trial and error type of thing. (but when you figure it out, be sure to let me know :wink:)
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Perry, i don't know if i can use this extract flavoring i bought or not after i reading what's in it. You and i would like it, 12% alcohol :lol:, i'm thinking the alcohol might stop the crystallization process, but if i works? just think getting drunk on creamed honey and toast. I'll get rich just selling to our forum members.:thumbsup: Jack
     
  6. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    You are asking 2 very different questions here, one is making creamed honey and the other is adding flavors to the honey before creaming it.
    the easiest way to make good creamed honey is by seeding add and stir in 10% or more of the finest creamed honey you can find. fill the jars or tubs and place on the basement floor and cover so the cool ground temperature will keep the honey at about 57* and granulation will copy the seed and the honey will granulate in about 2 to3 weeks.
    Adding flavors to honey is a little more challenging. You need to make sure adding the flavor doesn't increase the moisture content in the honey to high, so a more concentrated extract is sometimes needed. When fruit honeys are made, from a selling point of view you want to be using real flavor extracts not artificial flavoring, Any fruits being added need to be freeze dried and pulverized so as to not effect the moisture content of the honey and freeze dried fruit powder doesn't provide much fruit flavor in the honey so flavor extract in needed to be added also.
    Once made and creamed the honey needs to be stored in a cooler location because the honey will separate at temperatures in the 80's and you'll have liquid on top of the creamed. I cant help with the amounts of flavors, you have to go by taste.
    Good luck with your science experiment.
     
  8. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Thanks AB, that's what i needed to know. Jack
     
  9. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Ok I missed something here some where, what is the seeding you add to get it to crystalliz so it can be made into creamy honey.

    kebee
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    The "seeding" is creamed honey. Honey as it granulates forms crystals that are all sizes and can be quite granular. Creamed honey is honey that has granulated but the crystals are very fine. The easiest way to make creamed honey is to seed the honey you are trying to granulate. Liquid honey when it is "seeded" will form fine crystals, emulating those of the seeded honey, versus larger crystals.
    Another way to do it is to "grind" your own granulated honey (think morter and pestal) and use it to seed your liquid honey.
    Hope this makes sense. :mrgreen:
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Like Perry said,:thumbsup: I have a grinder and may compare home made crystals to store bought this winter when things slow down around here.:roll: Jack
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Another thought on the question: any of you who have "old" honey that has crystalized in the jar, can take this honey and use it for seeding new batches of creamed honey. Crush the crystalized honey to a consistency that can be easily spread, and mix it in to the honey that you want to cream. The key to success here is mixing the seed crystals thoroughly into the new honey and then chilling it. Don't use any heat to make the mixing easier. I have had success using much less than the usually recommended 10% seed honey. Once mixed well, a week or two in the fridge puts on the fnishing touch.
    I wouldn't be surprised if those of you with chilly fall weather could achieve the chilling effect by leaving the seeded honey jars outside in the cold garden or porch in a shaded location (sunlight shining on the jars would warm them and reverse the creaming process).